2016 Keynote Address

Photo of Danielle Black

Straight A’s and Stressed: Helping Gifted Children Navigate Stress and Anxiety to Succeed
What is the impact of anxiety on gifted children? How can we successfully parent gifted children to build resiliency and thrive in the face of stress and anxiety? Dr. Danielle Black, PhD, LCP, will present specific interventions to help parents navigate their children’s anxiety and stress. She will discuss the empirical research surrounding anxiety, as well as her own extensive clinical experience working with gifted children experiencing stress and anxiety.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Parent Session Descriptions

KEYNOTE: Straight A’s and Stressed: Helping Gifted Children Navigate Stress and Anxiety to Succeed    

Time: 1 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenter: Danielle Black, PhD, LCP

Description: Nothing is more frustrating to a parent than to see the talents of their children go under-developed. While ability matters in terms of achievement, much of success has to do with attitudes about effort, motivation, mindsets, confidence, risk-taking and other psychosocial skills, which are rarely a focus of school programming. In this session, our focus will be on the non-cognitive skills that are crucial for high achievement and how parents can assist their children to acquire them. During Dr. Black’s presentation, she will answer three main questions:

  1. What causes anxiety in gifted children, and what is the impact of anxiety on their growth?
  2. What are the common “parenting traps” when parenting anxious gifted children?
  3. How can we successfully build resiliency and allow gifted children to thrive in the face of stress and anxiety?

To answer each one of these important questions, Dr. Black will share specific suggestions that she has developed over time, based on empirical research and her extensive clinical experience working with gifted children. Dr. Black will present effective interventions to help parents navigate their children’s anxiety and stress.

Bio: Dr. Danielle Black is the Director of Child, Adolescent and Family Service Line and the Director of the Child Anxiety Clinic at The Family Institute at Northwestern University. Dr. Black holds an appointment as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Northwestern University. During her tenure at The Family Institute, Dr. Black has served in many roles including the Assistant Director of the Anxiety Research Program, a core member of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy team, a clinical supervisor and a member of the MFT faculty. As Director of the Child Anxiety Clinic, she oversees the newly formed clinic that provides treatment on a sliding-fee scale, training for students, and workshops for educators, parents and professionals.

Dr. Black has received training in empirically supported treatments such as Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Behavioral Marital Therapy, and Mindfulness based treatments. Dr. Black’s unique training in CBT and family therapy combine to provide an effective treatment for children and families coping with anxiety.

Dr. Black has presented and published several studies focusing on family violence, children’s adjustment to marital functioning, family therapy, and applications of CBT for GAD. Dr. Black has presented locally and nationally on the treatment of anxiety and the application of systemic interventions for Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

 

Session Title: Straight A’s and Stressed: A Conversation with Parents of Gifted Children

Presenter: Danielle Black, PhD, LCP

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Session Description: Dr. Black will conduct a workshop with parents immediately following her keynote address, allowing parents of gifted children to delve more deeply into the issues discussed. This is a great time for parents to reflect on their parenting experiences, to ask questions, and to engage with a like-minded community of parents of gifted children.

Bio: See above.

 

Session Title: Stick with It: Embracing Uncertainty by Learning to Shift Manually in an Automatic World

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Joseph J. Holtgreive, Assistant Dean, Lecturer, and Director of the Office of Personal Development at Northwestern University’s School of Engineering

Session Description: With ever-growing demands for our children’s attention, and what feels like ever-growing expectations of college admission offices, the need for resilience in the face of uncertainty and the ability to stay focused has never been greater. Have you ever felt the panic of losing the satellite connection to your GPS as you wonder if you even own a map anymore?  As we become more reliant on our technology and less reliant on ourselves, we lose our tolerance for uncertainty and the confidence that we possess the capacity to respond productively to it. During this interactive session, parents of gifted students will learn the science of self-management and trained attention that Holtgrieve has been practicing with college students for over a decade. Parents will learn how mindset influences a student’s level of success when making the difficult transition from high school to college, and how this transition can lead to unanticipated challenges for the best and brightest students. Parents will gain access to the empowering strategies and techniques Holtgrieve uses to transform Northwestern students into “whole-brain” engineers: by cultivating a quality of attention needed to build resiliency, develop a personal growth mindset, and achieve academic success. This engaging session will illuminate the ways parents can support their gifted students as they “manually shift” to a “higher gear” of performance!

Bio: Joseph Holtgreive advises students through his leadership of the Office of Personal Development at Northwestern University, helping them grow both personally and academically. He is an educator, counselor, and trained mediator, and has collaborated with colleagues across campus to create and deliver curriculum on mindfulness, emotional intelligence, and design thinking. Holtgreive is also an inventor and consultant specializing in human performance, innovation, and entrepreneurship. He is an Industrial Engineering graduate of Northwestern University and holds an EdM from Harvard University's School of Education.

 

Session Title: 10 Essential Tips for Ensuring Your Gifted Child's Success

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenters: Kathleen Nilles,Parent Services & Communications Manager, National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC)

Session Description: Every child is unique in his or her own way, which means that there is no master cookbook with the “secret sauce” for parenting your gifted child. However, there are key ingredients parents should understand and embrace in order to help their gifted child reach their potential. This session will discuss 10 essential tips – each of which is grounded in research and best practices – to guide parents in ensuring their gifted child’s success at home and in school. Topics include: understanding legislative nuances, “knowing your child,” working with teachers, providing stimulating enrichment experiences, supporting social-emotional needs, and teaching self-advocacy. This highly engaging, interactive session will allow parents to “swap and share,” so that everyone leaves with lots of ideas and the right recipe for their own child’s academic success.

Bio: A parent and passionate advocate, Kathleen Nilles is currently the Parent Services & Communications Manager for the National Association of Gifted Children (NAGC) in Washington, D.C. She has spent the past nine years immersed in understanding the needs of the gifted, and is well versed on issues at the national, state, and local levels. Nilles is also the editor of Parenting for High Potential magazine, chair of the Midwest Center for the Gifted, producer of the film “Through Gifted Eyes,” and co-chair of Professional Development for the Illinois Association for Gifted Children. She presents at national and state conferences, such as IAGC, Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG), is a frequent workshop facilitator for parents of gifted children. Nilles holds a master’s degree from Northeastern Illinois University in gifted education.

Session Descriptions for Grades 9-12

Session Title: Filling the Gap: How to Prepare for College Success with a Gap Year

Session Time: 1 pm to 1:45 pm

Presenter: Marianne Ruben, International Studies Director for High School and Gap Programs at CIEE

+ Student Panelists

Session Description: In this session, participants will discover what a gap year is, why students take them, and what kinds of enriching and transformative activities students become involved in during the year between high school and college. An expert in the field will cover the different types of gap year programs available and discuss why taking a gap year could be the most important decision a high school senior will make. Gap year alumni will discuss their various program choices, share their stories and experiences, and answer any questions participants may have.

 

Session Title: Secrets of a Forensic Scientist: Analyzing Biological Change

Session Time: 1 pm to 1:45 pm

Presenter: Monty Adams, Forensic Scientist and Instructor, Latino Youth High School and CTD

Session Description: The biological changes that occur in a body post-mortem can provide crucial information to forensic scientists engaged in a crime scene investigation. Analyzing these changes allows forensic scientists to establish a timeline of events and rule out a suspect’s alibis. In this interactive workshop, students will learn how to apply knowledge of post-mortem biological changes to establishing time of death in an investigation.

 

Session Title: Selecting the Right College for You

Session Time: 2 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenter: Shep Shanley, Senior Associate Director, Undergraduate Admissions, Northwestern University

Session Description: In this session, discover how to identify and talk about what is important to YOU in a college or university. Begin to explore which colleges - always more than one! - have what you are looking for in terms of programs of study, extracurricular activities, and social experience.

 

Session Title: Beyond the Visual: Multi-Sensory Product Design

Session Time: 2 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenter: Karen Schmidt, Graduate candidate at Northwestern University, Engineering Design and Innovation

Session Description: In this technological age, considering how a design looks is not enough: designers need to design for multi-sensory interaction. In this hands-on session, participants will explore how product designers harness the power of their senses to create innovative products and services that encompass multi-sensorial experiences. Participants will design for sight as well as touch, sound, smell and taste in this engaging session.

 

Session Title: Designer Slime: How Do Materials Scientists Make New Stuff?

Session Time: 3 pm to 3:45 pm

Presenter: Ashley Walter, Curriculum Developer, Office of STEM Education Partnerships, Northwestern University

Session Description: In this session, we will explore how materials scientists develop new materials by creating a slimy new product of our own. Participants will have the chance to learn about the design process used by engineers across many disciplines to solve real life problems and bring new products to market. 

 

Session Title: Solar Cell Workshop: Turning Sunlight into Power

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenters: Dana Cao, PhD candidate in Materials Chemistry at Northwestern University

Sameer Patwardhan, Materials Scientist and Postdoctoral Scholar at Northwestern University

Session Description: In this interactive hands-on workshop, students will construct solar cells capable of powering electronic devices with sunlight! The workshop will lead students in the step-by-step process of converting chemical energy into electrical energy: students will construct solution-processed perovskite solar cells, assemble cells into solar panels, and use them to collect energy from sunlight to power electronic devices. Students will compare different green energy technologies - solar panels, wind turbines, thermoelectric energy, batteries, fuel cells and super capacitors - and discuss the ongoing shift from fossil fuels towards renewable sources for energy production, and the challenges ahead.

 

Session Title: Study Abroad Panel

Session Time: 4 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenters: Northwestern student presenters

Session Description: In this panel presentation, current and former Northwestern University students will share their experiences with participants interested in study abroad programs! Each panelist will describe how they made the decision to study abroad, why they chose a particular country, how they prepared for travel, and what they studied while abroad. Participants are encouraged to bring all their best questions to this, well traveled group!

Session Descriptions for Grades 7-8

Session Title: Applications of Interactive 3D Design: Building a Virtual Reality Game

Session Time: 1 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenter: Alessandro Febretti, Senior Interactive Visualization Specialist, Northwestern University

Session Description: In this interactive and inspiring session, participants will learn the basics of game design and immersive virtual reality. As a group, we will design and program a simple videogame and play our creation on Northwestern’s first-of-it’s-kind advanced 3D visualization wall display. If you enjoy videogames, want to learn more on how they are made, and are interested in the future of immersive 3D visualizations - this session is for you!

 

Session Title: Word + Image: One Sheet Comic Workshop

Session Time: 1 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenter: Beth Hetland, Adjunct Assistant Professor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Participants of all artistic abilities - from experienced cartoonists to those who are just getting their feet wet - are welcome to attend this fun, hands-on, and creative workshop. We will dive into the world of visual storytelling and learn the basics for combining word and image in engaging comic strips and graphic novels - all using one sheet of paper! Tell your own story in a new and interesting way in this “one sheet” comic workshop.

 

Session Title: Powered by the Sun: How to Build a Solar Panel

Session Time: 1 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenters: Dana Cao, PhD candidate in Materials Chemistry at Northwestern University and

Sameer Patwardhan, Materials Scientist and Postdoctoral Scholar at Northwestern University

Session Description: In this interactive hands-on workshop, students will construct solar cells capable of powering electronic devices with sunlight! The workshop will lead students in the step-by-step process of converting one energy form into another, in this case chemical energy into electrical energy, and vice versa. Students will construct solution-processed perovskite solar cells, assemble cells into solar panels, and use them to collect sunlight and power electronic devices. We will discuss the ongoing shift from fossil fuels towards renewable sources for energy production - solar panels, wind turbines, thermoelectric energy, batteries, fuel cells and super capacitors - and the challenges ahead for these new energy technologies.

 

Session Title: Persuasive Legal Arguments

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Rebecca Birger, Cook County Regional Program Coordinator at Illinois JusticeCorps

Session Description: During this interactive session, participants will put their best persuasive writing and debate skills to use on a sample legal case. Participants will use the facts of a real-life case to craft opening and closing arguments for a trial. We will consider the arguments from all sides, and take turns acting as prosecutors, judges and jury members. We will also explore how legal arguments differ from other types of arguments through several interactive activities.

 

Session Title: Forensic Evidence Investigation: Processing a Crime Scene

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Monty Adams, Forensic Scientist and Instructor, Latino Youth High School and CTD

Session Description: Are you excited by the prospect of using your scientific knowledge to solve crimes? If so, then you might be interested in forensic science! In this hands-on workshop, students will try their hand at forensics by learning the basics of documenting and processing crime scene evidence. Students will learn the procedures for evidence collection that would be admissible in a court of law.

Session Title: It’s a Materials World: Exploring Superconductors and Polymers

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Matthew Peters, PhD Candidate, Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University

Session Description: Despite being one of the oldest fields of study, materials science and engineering doesn't get the exposure it deserves. In this session, students will learn about the fantastic properties of a variety of materials, and learn how materials scientists view the world around them. We will explore liquid nitrogen activated superconductors and optimize our very own polymers. Materials science is a fast growing field and this session will make sure you're ready for the new wave of materials science innovations.

Session Descriptions for Grades 4-6

Session Title: Human-Centered Design: Empathize, Brainstorm, and Build with Design for America

 

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Design for America, project member TBD                                                                 

Session Description: In this hands-on workshop, students will experience what human-centered design means by tackling a real design challenge. They will empathize with the needs of a particular user, imagine possible solutions, and build a prototype of their design. Students will see past projects implemented by the Design for America network, and will help identify new human-centered design problems that they would like to imagine creative solutions for.

 

Session Title: Sculptural Alchemy: Transforming Materials through Mold-Making and Casting

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Jessi Walsh, Interdisciplinary Artist and Instructor, Columbia College, Cinema Arts + Science

Session Description: Get your hands dirty in this sculpture workshop: learn to transform a three dimensional form from earth into “stone!” Participants will begin with sculpting a simple form using earthen clay, and will use this form to make a mold in alginate and plaster cloth. From this mold, participants will cast a durable cast-stone version of our original clay sculpture. Participants will see their sculptural form replicated and transformed into a new material! The group will discuss potential applications of the mold-making process in three-dimensional object production.

 

Session Title: Villains and Superheroes: Lake Michigan’s Aquatic Organisms

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Marie Ferentz, Instructor, Lane Tech and CTD

Session Description: In this interactive science session, participants will “dive” into fresh water aquatic ecosystems, like those found in the Great Lakes! They will learn about the “good guys” that make up a healthy balanced ecosystem, as well as the “bad guys” that threaten to disrupt the natural order by studying Lake Michigan and its inhabitants. Students will analyze water samples – collected from Lake Michigan (weather permitting) – and assess specific invasive species threatening this large body of water. Participants will choose specific “villains” and/ or “superheroes” of Lake Michigan to focus their own research and analysis, and will share their findings with the group.

 

Session Title: Power Puppets: Exploring Robotic Physics Applications with Everyday Materials

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Jeff Sweeton, Founder and Facilitator, CodeCreate Technology Education

Session Description: In this hands-on robotics session, participants will create and animate three-dimensional shapes of their own design using easily accessible materials. Participants will learn construction methods using two-dimensional planes, and will leverage the electromagnetic forces that propel motors using wire solenoids, switches and battery. The final animated puppets will be tested and explored for their fun narrative and physics applications.

 

Session Title: Digital Video Production

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Ruslana Lichtzier, Artist and Lecturer, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Session Description: Do you want to learn more about how to shoot, edit and export digital video? In this hands-on course, participants will be introduced to digital video editing software, which they will utilize as they conceive, plan, shoot ​ and edit short form videos. Participants will learn the essential elements of visual representation and storytelling, and will learn how to present their ideas in video format.

 

Session Title: Architecture Workshop: Engineering Sustainable Structures

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Richard Kasemsarn, Architect and Instructor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago and CTD

Session Description: What challenges do architects face when starting a design? In this engaging workshop, participants will explore how math, physics, and drawing are used by architects to design and engineer structures. Participants will create drawings and build scaled architecture model kits to make their own sustainable architectural projects. Throughout the process, we will demonstrate how good design principles are essential in making a building sustainable as well as stable.

Activities for Age 4 - Grade 3 (full afternoon)

Children age 4 through grade 3 enjoy hands-on architecture and construction activities, modeled on CTD’s Summer Leapfrog Program.

Please note: parents attending the 1 pm keynote address may drop off children at the activity site at 12:30 pm.

Presenter Biographies for Student Sessions

Monty Adams, Forensic Scientist and Instructor, Latino Youth High School and CTD

Secrets of a Forensic Scientist: Analyzing Biological Change       

Forensic Evidence Investigation: Processing a Crime Scene

Monty Adams was trained as a forensic scientist by the Illinois State Police Department of Forensic Services, and worked as a forensic chemist and serologist for the Chicago Police Department Crime Lab. He later became an investigator for the Chicago Fire Department's Internal Affairs Unit. Adams has also received training from John Reid & Associates in Interviewing and Interrogation and has worked with an FBI criminal profiler while working for the Chicago Police Department. Adams was the research coordinator for Calibre Press, a leading law enforcement training company that trained over 40,000 law enforcement officers in Street Survival®. As an educator, Adams has over ten years of high school teaching experience and currently teaches Chemistry, Health, and Forensic Science at Latino Youth High School in Chicago. He has taught courses in Forensic Psychology, Biology, Bioethics, Chemistry, and Physics at CTD since 2006. Adams received his BS degree in Biology from DePaul University, MAT in Biology from National-Louis University, and also an MM degree in flute performance from Northwestern University.

 

Rebecca Biger, Cook County Regional Program Coordinator at Illinois JusticeCorps

Persuasive Legal Arguments

Rebecca Birger first realized her passion for legal thinking while participating in her undergraduate mock trial team. Her transformative experience with mock trial lead her to pursue a career in the law. She graduated from DePaul University College of Law in 2013, with a focus in public interest law. Today, Birger works for The Chicago Bar Foundation, a program that helps improve the experiences of people without lawyers in the civil legal system.  

 

Design for America, Northwestern University

Human-Centered Design: Empathize, Brainstorm, and Build with Design for America

Design for America (DFA) is an award­-winning, nationwide network of university-led teams using design innovation to improve their communities and create social impact. DFA is proudly headquartered at Northwestern University and has studios at 29 college campuses around the country.

 

Dana Cao, PhD candidate in Materials Chemistry at Northwestern University

Powered by the Sun: How to Build a Solar Panel

Solar Cell Workshop: Turning Sunlight into Power

Dana Cao is a PhD candidate currently working at the Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) center at Northwestern University, where she is involved in the development of new technologies that utilize sunlight for electricity and fuel production. Cao completed her undergraduate studies in Applied Chemistry from the National University of Singapore (NUS).

 

Alessandro Febretti, Senior Interactive Visualization Specialist, Northwestern University

Applications of Interactive 3D Design: Building a Virtual Reality Game

Alessandro Febretti is a Senior Interactive Visualization Specialist at Northwestern University and a PhD Candidate at the Electronic Visualization Lab, University of Illinois at Chicago. His research is at the intersection of immersive environments, scientific visualization and collaborative work. Alessandro contributed to the creation of a small-scale immersive workspace (the OmegaDesk) and a large scale Hybrid Virtual Reality Environment (the CAVE2). Prior to joining EVL, Alessandro worked at Milestone Games and taught Videogame Design at the Polytechnic University of Milan, Italy.

 

Marie Ferentz, Instructor, Lane Tech and CTD

Villains and Superheroes: Lake Michigan’s Aquatic Organisms                                                          

Marie Ferentz teaches students in grades 9-12 STEM based Biology and Honors Biotechnology at Lane Tech College Prep High School. This is Marie Ferentz’s fifth summer at Center for Talent Development. She has taught various grade levels while at CTD, helping students as young as grade 4 and as old as grade 12 understand and be inspired by concepts in Biology. Ferentz has taught Genetics, Cell Biology, and Outbreak Biology courses.

 

Beth Hetland, Adjunct Assistant Professor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Word + Image: One Sheet Comic Workshop

Beth Hetland is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she teaches five classes a year in traditional and non-traditional comic making. Hetland has been making and self-publishing comics for 10 years, and in that time her work has appeared in anthologies, performances, galleries, and workshops across the United States and Canada. She earned her BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and her MFA in Comics at The Center for Cartoon Studies.

 

Richard Kasemsarn, Architect and Instructor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago and CTD

Architecture Workshop: Engineering Sustainable Structures

Richard Kasemsarn studied architecture at the University of Michigan and continued his studies with a Master of Architecture from Yale University. He teaches enrichment courses at the Center for Talent Development. His courses feature an interdisciplinary approach that demonstrates how science, engineering and design can all be developed together. In addition to teaching at CTD, Kasemsarn also teaches at the School of the Art Institute while maintaining a practice in architecture.

 

Ruslana Lichtzier, Artist and Lecturer, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Digital Video Production

Ruslana Lichtzier is an artist, writer, and curator. Born in Russia and raised in Israel, she received her BFA with Honor from Bezalel, Academy for Fine Art and Design, Jerusalem, Israel, and her MA in Visual and Critical Studies from The School of The Art Institute, Chicago, with a Dean scholarship. She is an active cultural participator in Chicago, Tel Aviv and Vienna. As an instructor, Lichtzier fully intergrades her various practices into her curriculum as an active experimental laboratory. Lichtzier is currently a lecturer in Contemporary Practices at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

Sameer Pawardhan, Materials Scientist and Postdoctoral Scholar at Northwestern University

Powered by the Sun: How to Build a Solar Panel

Solar Cell Workshop: Turning Sunlight into Power

Dr. Sameer Patwardhan is a materials scientist currently working at the Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) center at Northwestern University, where he is involved in the development of new technologies that utilize sunlight for electricity and fuel production. Pawardhan completed his undergraduate studies in Physical Chemistry from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IIT Bombay), India and his PhD in Chemical Engineering from Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), the Netherlands.

 

Matt Peters, PhD Candidate, Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University

It’s a Materials World: Exploring Superconductors and Polymers

Matt Peters taught in New Orleans as a grade 4 and 5 science teacher before joining the PhD program as a graduate student in Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University. His thesis work is based on computational thermodynamics, with the end goal of developing tools and databases to help accelerate the material design process. Peters participates in the Graduate Student Speaks Series (GS3) where he discusses his research with local middle and high school teachers on how to implement materials science in their classroom. Peters is currently a Saturday Enrichment Program instructor for the Center for Talent Development, where he has taught courses on Biotechnology and Engineering.

 

Marianne Rubin, International Studies Director for High School and Gap Programs at CIEE

Filling the Gap: How to Prepare for College Success with a Gap Year                                

Marianne Rubin taught Spanish at Evanston Township High School for 34 years and went to CIEE (The Council on International Education), a not-for-profit educational organization in Maine, to develop and expand access to international education for students in high school and recently graduated students. Rubin believes that an experience abroad before college will dramatically improve a student’s college experience as well as expand their access to employment in this globally connected world.

 

Karen Schmit, Graduate candidate, Northwestern University

Beyond the Visual: Multi-Sensory Product Design

Karen Schmit, currently a graduate student at Northwestern University in the Engineering Design and Innovation program, enjoys teaching design thinking and prototyping. As a graduate teaching assistant, she creates workshops of various design tools and mentors projects. Her primary interests lie in human perception, sustainable development & social impact problems that affect people on a daily basis. Schmit’s previous experience includes generating content and awareness about technology and innovation at Eindhoven University in the Netherlands as well as the Carolina Science Outreach Program at University of South Carolina. 

 

F. Sheppard Shanley, Senior Associate Director, Undergraduate Admissions, Northwestern University

Selecting the Right College for You

Sheppard Shanley recruits and reviews applications for U.S. and international students applying to Northwestern University. He has worked for University Admissions for more than four decades, and is frequently consulted for articles about college admission procedures. Shanley has previously taught Advanced Placement U.S. History and Advanced Placement European History courses.

 

Jeff Sweeton, Founder and Facilitator, CodeCreate Technology Education

Power Puppets: Exploring Robotic Physics Applications with Everyday Materials                      

Jeff Sweeton founded and facilitates CodeCreate Technology Education consultation and workshops with partner organizations including the National Science Foundation, Disney Magnet Schools, the Art Institute of Chicago, Intel Start Making!, the MacArthur Foundation and the Adler Planetarium. For the past seven years, Sweeton has taught a variety of media, electronics and engineering courses at Northwestern University's Center for Talent Development. He ran two Computer Clubhouses in Chicago for eight years, as part of an international network with the MIT Media Lab. He also works as a freelance filmmaker and has produced media for a diverse array of clients.

 

Jessi T. Walsh, Interdisciplinary Artist and Instructor, Columbia College Cinema Art + Science

Sculptural Alchemy: Transforming Materials through Mold-Making and Casting 

Jessi T. Walsh is an interdisciplinary performance artist, with 15 years of experience serving young artists K-12 and college-level in a variety of artistic disciplines as a teaching artist, education activist and mentor. Since 2003, she has served young artists K-12 in Chicago Public Schools. Walsh is currently teaching Production Design in the Cinema Art + Science department at Columbia College. As an artist, she works across several disciplines, mines her formative background in marine and botanical sciences, and draws on her travel experiences, including residencies in Europe, México, Belize and the American High Desert Southwest.

 

Ashley Walter, Curriculum Developer, Office of STEM Education Partnerships, Northwestern University

Designer Slime: How Do Materials Scientists Make New Stuff?

Ashley Walter currently works as a Curriculum Developer for Northwestern University’s Office of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education Partnerships. After receiving her MS from Purdue University in Entomology, Walter worked with The Nature Conservancy, served as the Pennsylvania Governor’s Invasive Species Council Coordinator, and worked as the Outreach Coordinator for the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at Northwestern. Each position has reinforced her love of helping people understand the impact science has on their daily lives and convinced her of the need for earlier and better science education.

Fees & Policies

Fees
$95 for one person
$125 for two people
$135 for three or more people
$50 for families with proven financial need (families eligible for or that receive free or reduced lunch qualify for a reduced $50 conference fee) 50% off registration for Northwestern employees with Wild Card

Policies
Full refund for cancellations before May 15. $50 refund May 15 – June 7. No refund after June 7.

Northwestern University is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for all events and programs. Accommodations such as Sign Language interpreters, accessible seating and presentation materials in alternate format are provided upon request. Please contact Sara Holwerda at sara.holwerda@northwestern.edu or 847/467-4465 by June 20. Every reasonable effort will be made to implement accommodations in an effective and timely manner.

Copyright 2014 Northwestern University Center for Talent Development