The Center for Talent Development
Center for Talent Development
Annotated Bibliography

Multi-Cultural Gifted
Acceleration
Career Planning
College Planning
Creativity
Curriculum for Gifted Learners, Planning Curriculum, Instructional Strategies with the Gifted
Gifted Adults
Gifted Females, Gifted Males
Gifted Teens - Giftedness and Adolescence
Giftedness in Young Adults
Homeschooling
Identification of Gifted Children
Legal Issues in Gifted
Musically Gifted
Parenting Gifted Students
Planning Ahead
Preschool Aged Gifted Children
Social-Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Children
The Highly Gifted
Under Achievement in Gifted Students

Multi-Cultural Gifted

  • Achieving Excellence. Educating the Gifted and Talented
    Francis A. Karnes and Kristen R. Stephens
    Upper Saddle, NJ: Pearson

    This text is a comprehensive presentation of the major issues in gifted education including theoretical stances on giftedness, creativity and talent, identification of gifted and talented learners, special populations including twice exceptional, culturally and linguistically diverse students, curriculum for gifted learners, program models, parenting issues, program evaluation and assessment and teachers of the gifted. Many of the chapters are written by leading researchers and practitioners in the field and because of that they deal with issue at a complex level, but present material in a very readable style appropriate for those new to the field of gifted education. Some chapters that are not typically seen in textbooks of this nature include ones on theories of intelligence, legal issues in the field, program evaluation, teachers of the gifted and talented and parenting.

  • In the Eyes of the Beholder. Critical Issues for Diversity in Gifted Education
    Diane Boothe and Julian C Stanley
    Prufrock Press, 2003
    This book focuses on a broad spectrum of issues concerning diversity in gifted education including special populations of learners, different domains of giftedness, different approaches to meeting the needs of gifted students, and research on programs designed to increase diversity in gifted programs. There are many interesting chapters but some notable ones include: Sethna's chapter on the views of parents of Indian descent on giftedness; Gottfredson's chapter on the relative contribution of IQ and other standardized tests for entrance into gifted programs on the under-representation of minority children; Kornhaber's chapter on the effects of multiple intelligence approaches to the identification of gifted children on diversity in such programs; and Lerner and Nagai's chapter on racial and ethnic preferences in admissions policies of institutions of higher education. This book is a must for anyone working to institute programs for gifted children within a racially and culturally diverse community.
  • Multicultural Gifted Education
    Donna Y. Ford and J. John Harris III
    Teachers College Press , New York, 1999.
    This book includes a comprehensive look at many issues surrounding the identification and instruction of minority gifted children. Ford is a leading expert on minority gifted education in the field. Chapters cover historical and legal perspectives on the education of gifted minority children, multicultural education and gifted education, multicultural curriculum and instruction, assessment and identification of gifted children, characteristics of minority families, and issues surrounding teacher preparation. Throughout significant research is cited. Appendices include a selected bibliography of multicultural and gifted resources as well as a checklist of assess programs for multicultural content and instructional methods.
  • Reversing Underachievement Among Gifted Black Students. Promising Practices and Programs.
    Donna Y. Ford
    1996 Teachers College Press, NY.
    Ford begins her book with an examination of definitions. The first chapter looks at definitions of giftedness and their implication for the identification of gifted Black students. The second chapter similarly explores definitions of underachievement. Subsequent chapters addresses many facet of underachievement in gifted Black students including motivation, beliefs about achievement, school factors, cultural issues, psychological factors and family factors. Ford devotes the last two chapters to potential solutions to the problem of underachievement among Black students including a review of promising practices gleaned from the Javits projects and directors for future research.
  • Special Populations in Gifted Education. Working with Diverse Gifted Learners
    Jaime A. Castellano
    2002, Pearson Allyn & Bacon: Boston, MA.
    This book provides a comprehensive look at various special populations of gifted learners including females, biracial and bicultural students, Native American students, AFrican-American students, Hispanic students, learning disabled students, gay students, and rural students. A strength of the book is its breadth in terms of the number of special populations dealt with in the various chapters and the depth of the discussion of issues relevant to each group of gifted learners.
back to top


Acceleration

  • A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students. Templeton National Report on Acceleration
    Colangelo, Nicholas; Assouline, Susan; Gross, Miraca U.M. (editors)
    Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education & Talent Development, 2004.
    More than just grade skipping, “acceleration means matching the level, complexity, and pace of the curriculum with the readiness and motivation of the student.” Endorsed by the National Association for Gifted Children, this two-part report on acceleration is an impressive achievement. The report provides accurate, research-based information about acceleration to those who most need it-parents, teachers, school administrators, and public policy-makers. It draws on the expertise of many of today's top experts in gifted education, pointing out that accelerating gifted students is strongly supported by those who have studied the practice. American educators, on the other hand, commonly are reluctant to consider acceleration as an option. Attempting to bridge the divide between these two positions, the authors outline some reasons why bright students in this country are “held back,” or not allowed to move through the curriculum at a rate that is appropriate for them, including:
    • Philosophy that children must be kept with their age group
    • Belief that acceleration hurries children out of childhood
    • Fear that acceleration hurts children socially
    • Political concerns about equity

    For further information, to give your own opinion on the report, or to download the entire report for free, visit www.nationdeceived.org.

  • Acceleration for Gifted Learners, K-5
    Joan Franklin Smutney, Sally Y. Walker, and Elizabeth A. Meckstroth
    Thousand Oaks, CA, 2007

    This book is a very practical guide to the topic of acceleration for teachers and school personnel who work with children of elementary school age. The authors share their expertise in early childhood development, gifted programming, and the social-emotional development of gifted children through the anecdotes and examples sprinkled throughout the text. The book broadens one's notions of the types of acceleration available to teachers and schools and how to effectively implement acceleration within the classroom via differentiated content, thinking strategies, products, and policy. An entire section of the book deals with the gifted child's personality and the social-emotional aspects of acceleration. This book is best for teachers and administrators but also appropriate for parents.

  • Early Entrance to College. A Guide to Success.
    Michelle C. Muratori
    Prufrock Press; Waco, TX, 2007

    This book is written for parents and students who are trying to decide if early entrance to college is a viable option for them. The author covers every aspect of early college entrance including its history, typical parental concerns, issues to consider before choosing early entrance, other options besides early college entrance for gifted students, how to prepare for early entrance, how to make a smooth transition to college, and what to do if early college entrance turns out not to be the right choice. Interspersed throughout are anecdotes from students and parents and a significant portion of the book is devoted to descriptions of existing early college entrance programs. This book is also a helpful guide for individuals who are in the position of counseling gifted students and their families regarding educational programs and options.

  • The Academic Acceleration of Gifted Children
    W. Thomas Southern and Eric D. Jones (editors)
    New York: Teachers College Press, Columbia University,1991.
    This is the best summary of the many accelerative strategies (e.g. grade skipping, early entrance to kindergarten, early college entrance, etc.) that exist for gifted learners and the research regarding them. This is a book for educators, administrators, and parents. It is convincing evidence of the viability of acceleration for meeting the needs of many gifted children.
back to top


Career Planning

  • 10 Things Employers Want You to Learn in College
    Bill Coplin
    This book highlights the most essential skills that companies look for in college graduates.  Students can start planning their curriculum right from the start.
  • Career & Life Explorer
    Michael Farr
    Farr uses the "Ideal Job Poster" to aid high school students find the right job for them.
  • Career Ideas for Teens Series
    Published by CareerBookstore.com
    This offers advice on how high school students can begin careers in all industries.  You can purchase each book (eight total) by industry.
  • Exploring Careers
    CareerBookstore.com
    This is an easy to read book that allows young students to explore their interests and match them with future jobs.
back to top


College Planning

  • How to Choose a College Major
    Linda Landis Andrews
    This book considers employment trends when suggesting a college major.
back to top


Creativity

  • Acceleration for Gifted Learners, K-5
    Joan Franklin Smutney, Sally Y. Walker, and Elizabeth A. Meckstroth
    Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2007

    This book is a very practical guide to the topic of acceleration for teachers and school personnel who work with children of elementary school age. The authors share their expertise in early childhood development, gifted programming, and the social-emotional development of gifted children through the anecdotes and examples sprinkled throughout the text. The book broadens one's notions of the types of acceleration available to teachers and schools and how to effectively implement acceleration within the classroom via differentiated content, thinking strategies, products, and policy. An entire section of the book deals with the gifted child's personality and the social-emotional aspects of acceleration. This book is best for teachers and administrators but also appropriate for parents.

  • Achieving Excellence. Educating the Gifted and Talented
    Francis A. Karnes and Kristen R. Stephens
    Upper Saddle, NJ: Pearson, 2007

    This text is a comprehensive presentation of the major issues in gifted education including theoretical stances on giftedness, creativity and talent, identification of gifted and talented learners, special populations including twice exceptional, culturally and linguistically diverse students, curriculum for gifted learners, program models, parenting issues, program evaluation and assessment and teachers of the gifted. Many of the chapters are written by leading researchers and practitioners in the field and because of that they deal with issue at a complex level, but present material in a very readable style appropriate for those new to the field of gifted education. Some chapters that are not typically seen in textbooks of this nature include ones on theories of intelligence, legal issues in the field, program evaluation, teachers of the gifted and talented and parenting.

  • Before the Gates of Excellence. The Determinants of Creative Genius
    R. Ochse
    Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1990
    This book presents research about eminent individuals - those who produce creative, ground-breaking work in their domain of talent. The book examines theories of creativity as well as the families and early environments of creative producers. A main focus of the book is the motivation to achieve at high levels and the factors that determine or produce this. The book is recommended for serious students of creativity.
  • My Teeming Brain: Understanding Creative Writers
    Jane Piirto
    Hampton Press 2002.

    The author of this book is an educator who studies giftedness as well as a published creative writer and poet. She has first hand knowledge about the process of creative writing the world of creative writers. This book is for anyone interested in the topic of creativity and writing in particular. It is a very detailed and thorough look at the many influences on talent development in this domain (personality, gender, community, culture), based on the authors pyramid model of talent development. IT is written at a fairly advanced level and is probably not for people new to the field.

  • Talent Children and Adults. Third Edition
    Jane Piirto
    Prufrock Press, 2007

    This is a very comprehensive look at the field of gifted education and creativity. The book is 730 pages long and contains 12 chapters. Perspectives on definitions of intelligence and theories of giftedness and creativity are covered as well as common practice in identifying giftedness and creativity. Piirto then proceeds to deal with each stage of development, young gifted children, giftedness during the elementary and middle school years, high school and college aged gifted students and adult giftedness. In the discussion of each phase, she organizes the presentation of material by domains or areas of giftedness including music, visual arts, writing and leadership.Two chapters deal with curriculum for the gifted and differentiation and there are chapters devoted to social emotional issues and special populations of gifted learners. This book emphasizes breadth of topics covered rather than depth and is an excellent resource for beginning students in the field.

  • Understanding Creativity
    Jane Piirto
    Great Potential Press, Scottsdale, AZ, 2002
    At first glance, this book appears to be a "textbook" on creativity. All sorts of issues are covered ranging from conceptions of creativity to creativity enhancing programs. The table of contents does not appear unique or unusual. However, a more in-depth read reveals many hidden treasures. The book is comprehensive and packed with information on research on many aspects of creativity. But several things make the book exceptional. Piirto devotes chapters to each major talent domain including the visual arts, creative writing, science, math, inventing, music, dance and athletics. For each of these sections, research is presented according to Piirto's model of talent development which emphasizes the role of genetics, personality, and environmental "suns" such as community, school, gender and chance. In her exposition of the research findings, Piirto includes detailed anecdotes from the lives of famous, renown experts that make this "textbook" read like fiction. This is an excellent book for anyone interested in creativity and educates readers regarding research findings in a very enjoyable, palatable way.
  • Understanding Those Who Create
    Jane Piirto
    Dayton, OH: Ohio Psychology Press, 1992.
    This is an excellent book for those who are interested in, yet new to the field of creativity. The author starts out by dealing with definitions and assessments of creativity and then goes on to present research about the characteristics of creative individuals within various fields such as visual artists, creative writers, creative scientists, mathematicians, musicians, and composers. This book is recommended for educators and parents.
back to top


Curriculum for Gifted Learners, Planning Curriculum, Instructional Strategies with the Gifted

  • Developing Mathematical Talent
    Susan Assouline and Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik
    Prufrock Press, 2003

    The authors' purpose in writing this book was to connect parents and teachers so that mathematically talented students could obtain more appropriate instruction in school. The authors give detailed information about assessment and testing, curricula, programming and additional resources related to mathematical talent and the mathematically gifted. The book will be helpful to both parents and educators as it combines technical information with case studies of actual students.

  • Developing Mathematically Promising Students
    Linda Jensen Sheffield
    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1999
    This is an edited volume with chapeters by experts on topics such as effective learning environments, creating a meathematical culture, building programs outside the classroom and organizational alternatives for the mathematically promising.
  • A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students. Templeton National Report on Acceleration
    Colangelo, Nicholas; Assouline, Susan; Gross, Miraca U.M. (eds)
    Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education & Talent Development, 2004.
    More than just grade skipping, “acceleration means matching the level, complexity, and pace of the curriculum with the readiness and motivation of the student.” Endorsed by the National Association for Gifted Children, this two-part report on acceleration is an impressive achievement. The report provides accurate, research-based information about acceleration to those who most need it-parents, teachers, school administrators, and public policy-makers. It draws on the expertise of many of today's top experts in gifted education, pointing out that accelerating gifted students is strongly supported by those who have studied the practice. American educators, on the other hand, commonly are reluctant to consider acceleration as an option. Attempting to bridge the divide between these two positions, the authors outline some reasons why bright students in this country are “held back,” or not allowed to move through the curriculum at a rate that is appropriate for them, including:
    • Philosophy that children must be kept with their age group
    • Belief that acceleration hurries children out of childhood
    • Fear that acceleration hurts children socially
    • Political concerns about equity

    For further information, to give your own opinion on the report, or to download the entire report for free, visit www.nationdeceived.org.

  • Acceleration for Gifted Learners, K-5
    Joan Franklin Smutney, Sally Y. Walker, and Elizabeth A. Meckstroth
    Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2007

    This book is a very practical guide to the topic of acceleration for teachers and school personnel who work with children of elementary school age. The authors share their expertise in early childhood development, gifted programming, and the social-emotional development of gifted children through the anecdotes and examples sprinkled throughout the text. The book broadens one's notions of the types of acceleration available to teachers and schools and how to effectively implement acceleration within the classroom via differentiated content, thinking strategies, products, and policy. An entire section of the book deals with the gifted child's personality and the social-emotional aspects of acceleration. This book is best for teachers and administrators but also appropriate for parents.

  • Being Gifted in School: An Introduction to Development, Guidance, and Teaching
    Laurence J. Coleman and Tracy L. Cross
    Waco, TX: Prufrock Press, 2000.
    This is a very comprehensive book about research, theory and practices in gifted education. While it is a general text, it is probably not for newcomers to the field. The book is very rich in research and resources. Chapters cover theories of giftedness, identification, the gifted child's families, counseling issues, curriculum, instructional theory, teaching methods, etc. The authors give not just the research about each issue or practice they present, but the assumptions underlying them. The chapters on the family, the lives of gifted individuals, creativity and theories of giftedness are especially thought provoking. This book would be most appropriate for educators who have some experience in the field and have done some reading of literature and research in gifted education.
  • Best Practices in Gifted Education. An Evidence-Based Guide
    Ann Robinson, Bruce M. Shore, Donna L. Enerson
    Prufrock Press. Waco, TX. 2007

    This book reviews the research regarding 29 practices in gifted education including classroom based practices such as flexible grouping, encouraging creativity, reading and language arts insturction, use of technology, inquiry-based instruction, practices with promising learners from low-income backgrounds, acceleration, career education, learning multiple languages, early literacy experiences for precocious and emerging readers, and twice-exceptional students. The authors' purpose is to present the empirical evidence regarding the effects and effectiveness of each practice on talented learners. This book is optimal for graduate students within the field of gifted or general education.

  • Comprehensive Curriculum for Gifted Learners
    Joyce VanTassel-Baska and others
    Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, 1988
    This book deals with curriculum development in the major content areas for gifted learners.
  • Critical Issues and Practices in Gifted Education: What the Research Says
    Jonathan A. Plucker and Carolyn M. Callahan
    Prufrock Press, 2007.

    This is a large volume, 785 pages, about the research base for 50 practices (e.g., identification, special schools, talent search programs, differentiated instruction) and/or issues (e.g. gifted girls, motivation, prodigies, professional developed) within the field of gifted education. This book is most useful for researchers and graduate students.

  • Crossover Children: A Sourcebook for Helping Children Who are Gifted and Learning Disabled. Second Edition
    Marlene Bireley
    Arlington, VA: Council for Exceptional Children, 1995.
    This is a brief (under 100 pages) book that deals with many issues surrounding children who are both gifted and learning disabled. It is written extremely well, succinct yet dense with useful information. The author says in the preface that this is a "how to do it book" and that she has "summarized the best ideas I could find on dealing with the immediate social/behavioral, enrichment, and intervention needs of the crossover child". This is an excellent resource for any teacher but a must for teachers of gifted children. The resource section at the end of the book is comprehensive and helpful.
  • Designing and Utilizing Evaluation for Gifted Program Improvement
    Joyce VanTassel-Baska and Annie Xuemei Feng
    Prufrock Press, Waco, TX. 2004.
    This book is essential for anyone running a gifted program at any level. VanTassel-Baska and her colleagues at the College of William and Mary have developed a practical model for evaluating gifted programs that stresses the utilization of findings for program improvement and involves comparisons of program components to national, professional standards and multiple perspectives on the program from various stakeholders. The model is eclectic, combining pieces from other well-known evaluation models. The model is illustrated via descriptions of evaluation studies conducted in Singapore, at the Hunter School for the Gifted in New York, and other places. There are chapters on data collection, designing and using surveys, and focus groups that offer very practical insider tips for successful implementation. The final chapter is a meta-analysis of finding across 7 evaluation studies that were conducted by the William and Mary staff. This book offers a fresh approach to evaluation that is compelling because of its practicality and utility.
  • Developing Verbal Talent: Ideas and Strategies for Teachers of Elementary and Middle School Students
    Joyce VanTassel-Baska, Dana T. Johnson, and Linda Neal Boyce
    Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, 1996
    This book focuses on developing a language arts curriculum for high ability learners in grades K-8. It brings together some of the most experienced and renowned educational experts who are deeply involved in finding ways to restore excellence in our nation's classrooms.
  • Genius Denied: How to Stop Wasting our Brightest Young Minds
    Jan & Bob Davidson
    Simon & Schuster, 2004.
    Written by the founders of the Davidson Institute for Talent Development, this book sheds light on the failure of our nation's public schools to adequately educate gifted students. Genius Denied makes the compelling argument that while school districts are required to “leave no child behind,” the needs of our most talented students are being overlooked. According to this book, most of the 29 states with funding for gifted programs are not specialized to address and develop the academic needs of highly gifted children. Also, in the midst of major federal and state initiatives to provide funding for low performing schools and children with disabilities, virtually no new funding is available for gifted and talented programming. The authors argue that the quest for equity in schools should aim to provide all children with “an education appropriate to their abilities - one that challenges them and helps them grow.”Genius Denied describes this “quiet crisis” in education with colorful examples and well -supported statistics, but it does not leave the reader hopeless. The book provides parents and educators with suggestions for how to overcome these inadequacies in the current educational system. The Davidsons use real life scenarios to teach parents about becoming their child's advocate, seeking out supplemental educational services, and finding mentors for their children. They discuss ways in which teachers, mentors and parents can work together to create more challenging academic programs in schools. The Davidsons argue that continued failure to address the needs of the nation's brightest students means a loss of potential in a country that depends on talented people to continue its forward progress. This book provides an eloquent illustration on this national problem complete with an inspiring set of action steps that can ultimately lead to a solution.
  • Gifted Children, Gifted Education
    Davis, Gary A.
    Great Potential Press, Scottsdale, AZ, 2006.

    This book provides a survey of many topics in gifted education from definitions, identification, programming options, creativity, acceleration, legal issues, etc. A defining feature of the book is the breadth of topics covered rather than the depth of coverage. It is ideal for those who are new to the field of gifted education and appropriate for parents and educators. Some exceptional feature of the book are the lists of resources within the chapters, detailed chapter summaries, and creative and amusing "interviews" at the beginning of each chapter.

  • Handbook of Gifted Education, 3rd ed
    Nicholas Colangelo and Gary A. David
    Allyn and Bacon, 2003

    This book examines a variety of curricula and instructinal models that foster academic and creative growth, including acceleration and enrichment programs. It also addresses psychological issues such as motivation, underachievement, perfectionism, and "emotional giftedness."

  • How to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms. 2nd edition
    Carol Ann Tomlinson
    2001. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Alexandria, VA

    This is a short book aimed at teachers desiring to learn how to provide differentiated instruction within mixed ability classrooms. The author defines what differentiation is and what it is not, the role of the teacher and aspects of the environment in a differentiated classroom.Very helpful chapters are those devoted to strategies for planning lessons that are differentiated based on students readiness, students interest and student learning profiles. There are also chapters on the how to's of differentiating process, product and content. This book is written at the introductory level.

  • Methods and Materials for Teaching the Gifted
    Frances A. Karnes and Suzanne M. Bean (eds)
    Waco, TX: Prufrock Press
    This book is written for teachers who work with gifted children although the material would be relevant and useful for all teachers. The focus of this book is classroom instruction and classroom activities. There are chapters on layering differentiated curriculum, product development, teaching analytical and critical thinking skills, problem based learning, affective education, teaching research skills, designing mentorships and independent studies, cooperative learning, and use of simulations. This book is resource rich offering readers web sites and product information.
  • Planning and Implementing Programs for the Gifted
    James H. Borland
    New York: Teachers College Press, Columbia University, 1989
    This book is written by another leading expert on the topics of curriculum and program models for gifted learners. This book gives a detailed analysis of different program types ranging from pull-out to self-contained classes. This book is recommended for the educator who wants to learn about all the various program models used in gifted education.
  • Planning Effective Curriculum for Gifted Learners
    Joyce VanTassel-Baska
    Denver, CO: Love Publishing Co., 1992
    This is a very comprehensive book dealing with all aspects of curriculum development and planning. It focuses on the process of planning and creating curriculum. It is written by one of the leading experts on curriculum for gifted learners. This book would be especially helpful to educators.
  • Re-Forming Gifted Education: Matching the Program to the Child
    Karen Rogers
    Scottsdale, AZ: Gifted Potential Press, 2002
    This book is an important resource for parents and educators. The author is a highly respected researcher in the field of gifted education, and also draws from her experience in developing individual educational plans for over 150 high ability children. The chapters of the book take parents and educators systematically through a process of planning, information gathering and negotiation, resulting in a personalized, comprehensive plan for a gifted learner. Rogers helps parents understand their child's personality traits, learning preferences, strengths, and interests. She then educates parents about the various program options that could be used to accommodate their gifted child's abilities. From there, Rogers leads her readers through the process of actually writing the plan and working with school personnel to get it implemented. The text is peppered with real examples of gifted children, helping to bring the information down to a concrete, practical level. A strength of this book is the combination of research data with practical advice and tools such as data gathering surveys. Parents who wish to follow Roger's process will be rewarded with a detailed educational plan for their child, but they will need to be prepared to work carefully and systematically through the steps she provides in the various chapters of the book. Click here for an article on her book.
  • Tales From Shakespeare
    Charles & Mary Lamb
    London: Everyman Publishing Company, 1994.
    For the younger child, Shakespeare's plays are difficult to read and comprehend. Recognition of this fact caused a noted English bookseller to commission the Lamb book. The Lambs have taken the plays of Shakespeare and simplified them, eliminating sub-plots and minor characters. The Lambs focused on the moral issues of Shakespeare's plays, using them as a teaching tool for their young audience. Each of the "Tales" is approximately ten pages in length, making it manageable for a child to read or listen to. A ten year old would have had no problem digesting this book. For a younger aged child, this book provides an excellent opportunity for reading and discussion together with a parent or other adult. Twenty of Shakespeare's plays have been included in the book. The styles of the stories vary slightly; Charles Lamb wrote the tragedies, while his sister authored the comedies. Children can be challenged to discuss style differences between the two authors. Everyman's Tales From Shakespeare is an excellent book to read with your child to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of the stories of one of the world's most beloved and timeless authors.
  • Teaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom. Strategies and Techniques Every Teacher Can Use to Meet the Academic Needs of the Gifted and Talented
    Susan Winebrenner
    Free Spirit Press, 1992
    This book lives up to its title. It gives very practical information and advice about using techniques such as learning contracts, curriculum compacting, cooperative learning, and cluster grouping with gifted students. The author also deals with evaluation tools and techniques for gifted students, reading instruction and creating learning activities appropriate in level of challenge and pace. A very good resource for elementary and middle school teachers.
  • Teaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom: Strategies and Techniques Every Teacher Can Use to Meet the Academic Needs of the Gifted and Talented
    Susan Winebrenner
    Free Spirit Press, 2000

    The definitive guide to meeting the learning needs of gifted students in the mixed abilities classroom - without losing control, causing resentment, or spending hours preparing extra materials. Each chapter presents a specific strategy. Step-by-step instructions explain how to implement the strategy; scenarios illustrate the strategy in action. Written by a teacher and field-tested, this book makes school more rewarding for everyone. It includes 30 reproducible handout masters.

  • The Handbook of Secondary Gifted Education
    Felicia A. Dixon and Sidney M Moon (eds)
    Prufrock Press, Waco, Texas. 2006.

    This book is a comprehensive look at both the development of gifted adolescents and the options available for their talent development. There are chapters devoted to the unique psychological and social-emotional issues of adolescence such as identity formation, career development, and how these are traversed by gifted students and particularly special populations of gifted adolescents including students of color, students with learning disabilities and gifted females. Other chapters discuss the talent development process in various domains including sports, the visual arts, and academic domains. There are chapters devoted to various curricular areas and what schools can do within these to develop the abilities of gifted adolescents as well as chapters on various program options currently available including special schools and extra-curricular options. Finally, the last section of this comprehensive book looks at teacher education and professional development for teachers who work with gifted adolescents. This book is comprehensive but written at a level for even newcomers to the field. It is recommended for teachers, adminstrators and parents as well.

  • This book is written for teachers who work with gifted children although the material would be relevant and useful for all teachers. The focus of this book is classroom instruction and classroom activities. There are chapters on layering differentiated cu
    Carol Ann Tomlinson
    Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Alexandria, VA. 1999.

    This is a good introduction to the concept of differentiation. The book is not specifically focused on gifted learners, although they are included, but differentiation aimed at all level of abilities. This book is recommended for teachers who are new to differentiation as it provides a general overview of the basis for differentiated instruction, characteristics of a differentiated classroom and instructional strategies to support differentiation.

back to top


Gifted Adults

  • Liberating Everyday Genius
    Mary Elaine Jacobsen
    Ballantine Books, New York, 1999.
    One of the few books on gifted adults, Dr. Jacobsen is speaking to adults, as complex intense personalities, unrecognized ability, who while never formally identified as gifted in childhood nevertheless possess characteristics such as exceptional problem solving and analytical abilities, complex personalities and intense emotions. These individuals often feel different and alone, trying to suppress the very characteristics (dominant personality, need for challenge, driven) that make them gifted. Dr. Jacobsen attempts to help gifted adults recognize themselves and move towards liberating acceptance of themselves in order to lead happier, more productive lives.
back to top


Gifted Females, Gifted Males

  • Girls and Young Women Inventing
    Karnes, Frances A. and Suzanne M. Bean
    Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Press
    Inventing features twenty girls and young women who tell their own first-person stories about their inventions. They describe how they came up with their ideas and then made their ideas into working inventions. In addition to these stories, the authors describe the steps inventors use to turn an idea into a useful, working invention. The book also includes organizations and books to help girls and young women develop their talent of inventing. Even if the reader never becomes an inventor, he/she will surely think more creatively after reading this book.
  • Girls and Young Women Leading the Way
    Karnes, Frances A. and Suzanne M. Bean
    Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Press
    Leading the Way tells the true stories of twenty girls and young women from around the country who have exhibited leadership. Each story describes a vision, a goal-setting and an accomplishment. It is followed by a question and activity section that provides the reader with ideas on leadership opportunities in their own community and school. The first ten stories are written by girls and young women who made a change in their communities. The second ten stories are written by young leaders who made a change at their school. They all saw something that needed doing; they created a plan; they put their ideas into action. After presenting these twenty stories, the authors offer a Leadership Handbook in Part Three of the book that defines leadership and discusses how leadership has changed throughout history. This section also includes quotes from famous women leaders and books on women leaders who have inspired others.
  • Great Books for Girls
    Kathleen Odean
    New York: Ballantine Books, 1997
  • Remarkable Women. Perspectives on Female Talent Development
    Karen Arnold, Kathleen D. Noble, and Rena T. Subotnik
    Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 1996
    This book is a compilation of research and thinking about gifted females. Chapters deal with women with different areas of talent, women from different cultures, and women of different generations. This book is recommended for those with a serious interest in the development of gifted girls who desire a more scholarly treatment of the issues.
  • See Jane Win for Girls: A Smart Girl's Guide to Success
    Sylvia Rimm
    Minneapolis, Free Spirit Publishing, 2003
  • Smart Boys: Talent, Manhood, and the Search for Meaning
    Barbara A. Kerr, Ph.D. and Sanford J. Cohn, Ph.D
    Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press, Inc., 2001
    This book breaks new ground in the field of gifted education. The authors decided to investigate young gifted males after observing smart boys underachieving and growing discouraged in school. The difficulties continued into adulthood—these struggling gifted boys often grew into gifted men who felt discontented in careers and personal relationships. Kerr and Cohn review the scant research on gifted boys and the literature on masculinity. They trace the unique concerns that confront gifted males in our society from pre-school through adulthood. In other chapters, a diverse variety of boys are discussed, including boys of color, economically disadvantaged boys, and “sissies, fat boys, and nerds.” The authors also discuss how parents can shape or hinder emotional and psychological development in gifted males. Finally, the book offers a new perspective on the needs of gifted males. The text is easy reading and informative for both educators and parents.
  • Smart Girls Gifted Women
    Barbara A. Kerr
    Dayton, OH: Ohio Psychology Press, 1991
    This book is a classic on gifted females. The author conducted a study of her female classmates in a gifted program. Her results highlight the special obstacles that females face and suggests some possible solutions. This book is very readable and would be helpful to parents, educators, and even teens.
  • Smart Girls Two
    Barbara A Kerr
    Dayton, OH: Ohio Psychology Press, 1994
    This book deals with the reasons why so many young women fail to live up to their potential. It deals with issues that confront girls throughout their development - from early childhood to motherhood and family. Like its predecessor above, this book is very readable and is recommended for parents, educators, teens and young adults.
  • Teaching Young Gifted Children in the Regular Classroom
    Joan Franklin Smutny, Sally Yahnke Walker, and Elizabeth A. Meckstroth
    Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Press, 1997
    This is a good book for educators and is oriented specifically towards the classroom teacher. It contains chapters on identifying preschool aged gifted children, creating a learning environment, compacting and extending the curriculum, promoting creativity and imagination and understanding children's emotional need. It also contains reproducible forms for teachers.
  • Work Left Undone: Choices and Compromises of Talented Females
    Sally Morgan Reis
    Creative Learning Press, Storrs, CT, 1998
    Reis provides a very comprehensive look at the problems gifted girls face in reaching their potential. She begins by laying out the complex choices faced by women in our current society, particularly the conflicts felt acutely by gifted girls. Subsequent chapters address particular groups of obstacles and barriers including those that are "external" such as cultural attitudes, lack of family supports, etc., and those that are internal such as psychological factors and personality issues. Reis addresses special groups of girls including girls who are culturally diverse or economically disadvantaged, women in science and mathematics, talented artists, older gifted women, and women who opt for a conventional career. The book ends with a chapter devoted to recommendations and a chapter with a broad array of resources of all types.
back to top


Gifted Teens - Giftedness and Adolescence

  • Talented Teenagers. The Roots of Success and Failure
    Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Kevin Rathunde, and Samuel Whalen
    Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1993.
    This book is the most comprehensive look at talented teenagers. It reports the results of a study of teens from two suburban schools in Illinois. The data reveal the day-to-day lives of gifted adolescents. This book deals with many issues but particularly factors involved in remaining engaged in one's talent field during the adolescent years. Recommended for educators mainly, but many chapters would be good reading for parents also.
  • The Gifted Kids Survival Guide: A Teen Handbook
    Galbraith, J.
    Minneapolis: Free Spirit Publishing, 1996.
  • The Handbook of Secondary Gifted Education
    Felicia A. Dixon and Sidney M Moon (eds)
    2006, Prufrock Press, Waco, Texas

    This book is a comprehensive look at both the development of gifted adolescents and the options available for their talent development. There are chapters devoted to the unique psychological and social-emotional issues of adolescence such as identity formation, career development, and how these are traversed by gifted students and particularly special populations of gifted adolescents including students of color, students with learning disabilities and gifted females. Other chapters discuss the talent development process in various domains including sports, the visual arts, and academic domains. There are chapters devoted to various curricular areas and what schools can do within these to develop the abilities of gifted adolescents as well as chapters on various program options currently available including special schools and extra-curricular options. Finally, the last section of this comprehensive book looks at teacher education and professional development for teachers who work with gifted adolescents. This book is comprehensive but written at a level for even newcomers to the field. It is recommended for teachers, adminstrators and parents as well.

back to top


Giftedness in Young Adults

  • Early Entrance to College. A Guide to Success
    Michelle C. Muratori
    Prufrock Press; Waco, TX, 2007

    This book is written for parents and students who are trying to decide if early entrance to college is a viable option for them. The author covers every aspect of early college entrance including its history, typical parental concerns, issues to consider before choosing early entrance, other options besides early college entrance for gifted students, how to prepare for early entrance, how to make a smooth transition to college, and what to do if early college entrance turns out not to be the right choice. Interspersed throughout are anecdotes from students and parents and a significant portion of the book is devoted to descriptions of existing early college entrance programs. This book is also a helpful guide for individuals who are in the position of counseling gifted students and their families regarding educational programs and options.

  • Lives of Promise. What Becomes of High School Valedictorians.
    Karen D. Arnold
    San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1995.
    This book compiles the results of a longitudinal study of a group of valedictorians. The book focuses on their paths from the time of graduation from high school to their early thirties. The book is fascinating, particularly in what it reveals about the trajectories of females and minority individuals. Its primary focus is on the transition from college to early career. This book is recommended for educators and parents.
back to top


Homeschooling

  • Homeschool Your Child for Free: More Than 1,200 Smart, Effective, and Practical Resources for Home Education on the Internet and Beyond
    Gold, L., & Zielinski, J.
    Prima Publishing, 2000.
  • The Big Book of Home Learning: Afterschooling and Extras
    Pride, M.
    (out of print; ASIN: 0891075518; try a local library or interlibrary loan.)
  • The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home
    Wise, J., & Wise-Bauer, S.
    New York: W. W. Norton Company, 1999.
back to top


Identification of Gifted Children

  • A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students. Templeton National Report on Acceleration
    Eds. Colangelo, Nicholas; Assouline, Susan; Gross, Miraca U.M.
    Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education & Talent Development, 2004
    More than just grade skipping, “acceleration means matching the level, complexity, and pace of the curriculum with the readiness and motivation of the student.” Endorsed by the National Association for Gifted Children, this two-part report on acceleration is an impressive achievement. The report provides accurate, research-based information about acceleration to those who most need it-parents, teachers, school administrators, and public policy-makers. It draws on the expertise of many of today's top experts in gifted education, pointing out that accelerating gifted students is strongly supported by those who have studied the practice. American educators, on the other hand, commonly are reluctant to consider acceleration as an option. Attempting to bridge the divide between these two positions, the authors outline some reasons why bright students in this country are “held back,” or not allowed to move through the curriculum at a rate that is appropriate for them, including:
    • Philosophy that children must be kept with their age group
    • Belief that acceleration hurries children out of childhood
    • Fear that acceleration hurts children socially
    • Political concerns about equity

    For further information, to give your own opinion on the report, or to download the entire report for free, visit www.nationdeceived.org.


  • Acceleration for Gifted Learners, K-5
    Joan Franklin Smutney, Sally Y. Walker, and Elizabeth A. Meckstroth
    Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2007.
    This book is a very practical guide to the topic of acceleration for teachers and school personnel who work with children of elementary school age. The authors share their expertise in early childhood development, gifted programming, and the social-emotional development of gifted children through the anecdotes and examples sprinkled throughout the text. The book broadens one's notions of the types of acceleration available to teachers and schools and how to effectively implement acceleration within the classroom via differentiated content, thinking strategies, products, and policy. An entire section of the book deals with the gifted child's personality and the social-emotional aspects of acceleration. This book is best for teachers and administrators but also appropriate for parents.
  • Achieving Excellence. Educating the Gifted and Talented
    Francis A. Karnes and Kristen R. Stephens
    Upper Saddle, NJ: Pearson, 2008
    Francis A. Karnes and Kristen R. Stephens. Achieving Excellence. Educating the Gifted and Talented. Upper Saddle, NJ: Pearson, 2008.
    This text is a comprehensive presentation of the major issues in gifted education including theoretical stances on giftedness, creativity and talent, identification of gifted and talented learners, special populations including twice exceptional, culturally and linguistically diverse students, curriculum for gifted learners, program models, parenting issues, program evaluation and assessment and teachers of the gifted. Many of the chapters are written by leading researchers and practitioners in the field and because of that they deal with issue at a complex level, but present material in a very readable style appropriate for those new to the field of gifted education. Some chapters that are not typically seen in textbooks of this nature include ones on theories of intelligence, legal issues in the field, program evaluation, teachers of the gifted and talented and parenting.
  • Being Gifted in School
    Tracy L. Cross and Larry J. Coleman
    Prufrock Press, Waco, TX, 2000.
    This is a very comprehensive book about research, theory and practices in gifted education. While it is a general text, it is probably not for newcomers to the field. The book is very rich in research and resources. Chapters cover theories of giftedness, identification, the gifted child's families, counseling issues, curriculum, instructional theory, teaching methods, etc. The authors give not just the research about each issue or practice they present, but the assumptions underlying them. The chapters on the family, the lives of gifted individuals, creativity and theories of giftedness are especially thought provoking. This book would be most appropriate for educators who have some experience in the field and have done some reading of literature and research in gifted education.
  • Conceptions of Giftedness
    Robert J. Sternberg and Janet E. Davidson (eds)
    Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1986.
    This is a very comprehensive review of the major theories of giftedness including Rezulli's Triad Enrichment Model, Sternberg's triarchic theory of giftedness, and chapters by other major researchers in the field of gifted education. This book presumes some familiarity with the field and is recommended for those who really want to immerse themselves in the theoretical issues involved in identifying giftedness.
  • Conceptions of Giftedness, Second Edition
    Robert J Sternberg and Janet E. Davidson (Eds)
    Cambridge University Press, 2005
    The is the second edition of this book and it is wonderful expansion of the first edition. The book reviews many well known known theories of giftedness and creativity including those of GAne, Renzulli, and Sternberg. It also includes chapters by authors that offer new and interesting perspectives on giftedness and talent. The first chapter by Borland from Teachers College, Columbia University, argues " that the concept of the gifted child is logically, pragmatically, and-with respect to the consequences of is application in American education-morally untenable... (pg 1). Other chapters examine giftedness from the perspectives of society and school. This book is written for those with some background in the field of gifted education and those who want to think and reflect from a "bird's eye view" on the field.
  • Content-Based Curriculum for High Ability Learners
    Joyce VanTassel-Baska and Catherine A. Little
    Prufrock Press: Waco, TX
    Written by recognized gifted curriculum leader VanTassel-Baska and her associates at the Center for Gifted Education at the College of William and Mary, this service publication of the National Association for Gifted Children illustrates award-winning curriculum units in language arts, social studies and science. It begins with a presentation of the Integrated Curriculum Model, which consists of an advanced content dimension, a process/product dimension, and an issues/themes dimension. Subsequent chapters cover acceleration, incorporating higher order process skills into content, concept development, and developing creative student products. The second section contains chapters on curricula for high ability learners in language arts, science, mathematics and social studies. Each chapter shows how the integrated curriculum model relates to curricular standards advanced by national organizations such as the National Science Education Standards developed by the National Research Council. The emphasis is on adaptation of existing curricula, with examples drawn from the William and Mary curriculum units. The book’s final chapters feature criteria to select appropriate content, resources and instructional strategies. A chapter on assessment deals with test reliability, validity, and authentic assessment concerns. A final chapter assists educators with aligning curricula with state standards. Because the book is very readable, it is particularly useful for educators relatively new to the field while also appropriate for experienced educators. While it does not recommend resources for curriculum decisions, the book provides solid guidelines for educators attempting to differentiate curricula for gifted learners within a diverse body of learners or within a special homogeneous classroom of gifted students.
  • Critical Issues and Practices in Gifted Education: What the Research Says
    Jonathan A. Plucker and Carolyn M. Callahan
    Prufrock Press, 2007
    This is a large volume, 785 pages, about the research base for 50 practices (e.g., identification, special schools, talent search programs, differentiated instruction) and/or issues (e.g. gifted girls, motivation, prodigies, professional developed) within the field of gifted education. This book is most useful for researchers and graduate students.
  • Identifying Gifted Students. A Practical Guide
    Edited by Susan K. Johnsen
    Prufrock Press, 2004

    This is a wonderful, concise, yet thorough guide to appropriate identification procedures for gifted children. And, the book lives up to its name--it is practical and sensible and written for school administrators. There are chapters in the book on qualitative and quantitative assessment, culture-fair and nonbiased assessment, technical properties of tests and measurements, selection decisions. Especially helpful is chapter on how to use test scores and other data to appropriately place students into programs and services. The authors present 5 guidelines that address weighting of assessments, comparability of scores, errors in measurement, and variability in performance.This book is recommended for district administrators, gifted coordinators and teachers.

  • Planning and Implementing Programs for the Gifted
    James H. Borland
    New York: Teachers College Press, Columbia University, 1989.
  • Talent Children and Adults. Third Edition
    Jane Piirto
    Prufrock Press, 2007
    This is a very comprehensive look at the field of gifted education and creativity. The book is 730 pages long and contains 12 chapters. Perspectives on definitions of intelligence and theories of giftedness and creativity are covered as well as common practice in identifying giftedness and creativity. Piirto then proceeds to deal with each stage of development, young gifted children, giftedness during the elementary and middle school years, high school and college aged gifted students and adult giftedness. In the discussion of each phase, she organizes the presentation of material by domains or areas of giftedness including music, visual arts, writing and leadership.Two chapters deal with curriculum for the gifted and differentiation and there are chapters devoted to social emotional issues and special populations of gifted learners. This book emphasizes breadth of topics covered rather than depth and is an excellent resource for beginning students in the field.
  • The Handbook of Gifted Education. Third Edition
    Colangelo, N., and Davis, G. A.
    Boston; Allyn and Bacon. 2002
    While all chapters from previous editions are updated with recent research, this review focuses on new chapters. This comprehensive book, a classic and widely read text in the field, is recommended for all educators working with gifted students. A highlight is “The Science and Politics of Intelligence in Gifted Education,” where respected researcher Linda Gottfredson expertly examines age-old questions: Are there multiple kinds of giftedness? …intelligence? Does intellectual giftedness result mostly from nature or nurture? What abilities does an IQ score represent? Can all students develop high abilities with proper instruction and sufficient practice? (p. 25) Gottfredson identifies popular beliefs regarding these issues and points out misconceptions. Some findings indicate that a ubiquitous general ability factor underlies all mental abilities, that IQ predicts valued life outcomes, and that heritability of IQ increases over one’s lifespan. Gottfredson’s implications may cause readers to re-evaluate their beliefs and practices in gifted education. In another chapter, Canadian researcher Francoys Gagné explains his Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent. According to Gagné’s theory, “giftedness” refers to raw natural abilities that place an individual in the top 10% of age peers. “Talent” is the systematically developed abilities, skills, or knowledge that place an individual in the top 10% of age peers. The potentially useful model attractively quantifies levels of giftedness from “mildly gifted” to “extremely gifted.” Authors Ellen Winner and Gail Martino explode the myth that artistic talent is demonstrated through one’s ability to draw realistically. They contest that the defining characteristic of young artistic talent is the “ability to master one or more of the culture’s norms of artistry at a very early age” (p. 347). The authors mention a young girl whose drawings mimic Picasso and Miro’s works. Sidney Moon adds to the counseling and psychological issues section, describing two categories of family counseling—family guidance and family therapy—as particularly useful with gifted children. Arthur Costa contributed a chapter on skillful thinking habits, listing 16 ways of “behaving intelligently.” Ken Seely opens discussion on high-risk gifted learners—gifted students who are truant, disruptive, violent, or participating in crime or substance abuse. Seely addresses risk and protective factors, and the roles of intelligence, learning style, competence and motivation in maladaptive behavior while offering guidelines for assessment and intervention. David Lubinske’s chapter on spatial giftedness argues that identification procedures ignore students who have spatial visualization ability and could experience vocational achievement. Other new chapters examine teachers, rural schools, and technology.
back to top


Legal Issues in Gifted

  • Genius Denied How to Stop Wasting our Brightest Young Minds
    Jan & Bob Davidson
    Simon & Schuster, 2004.
    Written by the founders of the Davidson Institute for Talent Development, this book sheds light on the failure of our nation's public schools to adequately educate gifted students. Genius Denied makes the compelling argument that while school districts are required to “leave no child behind,” the needs of our most talented students are being overlooked.
    According to this book, most of the 29 states with funding for gifted programs are not specialized to address and develop the academic needs of highly gifted children. Also, in the midst of major federal and state initiatives to provide funding for low performing schools and children with disabilities, virtually no new funding is available for gifted and talented programming. The authors argue that the quest for equity in schools should aim to provide all children with “an education appropriate to their abilities - one that challenges them and helps them grow.”
    Genius Denied describes this “quiet crisis” in education with colorful examples and well -supported statistics, but it does not leave the reader hopeless. The book provides parents and educators with suggestions for how to overcome these inadequacies in the current educational system. The Davidsons use real life scenarios to teach parents about becoming their child's advocate, seeking out supplemental educational services, and finding mentors for their children. They discuss ways in which teachers, mentors and parents can work together to create more challenging academic programs in schools.
    The Davidsons argue that continued failure to address the needs of the nation's brightest students means a loss of potential in a country that depends on talented people to continue its forward progress. This book provides an eloquent illustration on this national problem complete with an inspiring set of action steps that can ultimately lead to a solution.

     

  • Gifted Children and Legal Issues in Education. Parent's Stories of Hope
    Frances A. Karnes and Ronald G. Marquardt
    Ohio Psychology Press. 1991.
    This is really a companion piece to the book above and is riveting reading for anyone interested in the field. Karnes and Marquardt collected 13 case studies of various legal cases involving gifted children, school policies, etc. The stories were written by the parents themselves and detail their struggles with obtaining appropriate instruction and programs for their children, obtaining admissions to schools or in some cases, early admissions, and in obtaining credit for courses done outside of school or earlier than typical.
  • Gifted Children and Legal Issues. An Update
    Frances A. Karnes and Ronald G. Marquardt
    Gifted Psychology Press. 2000
    This is meant to be an update to the 1991 volume. It has several new chapters including one on the role of the Office of Civil Rights in legal issues surrounding gifted children and a brief chapter on negotiation.
  • Gifted Children and the Law. Mediation, Due Process and Court Cases
    Frances A. Karnes and Ronald G. Marquardt
    Ohio Psychology Press, 1991
    This book was meant for many audiences--parents embroiled in battles with local schools who may be seeking legal action, school districts who need to be better informed about legal issues surrounding gifted children, and lawyers who may be representing children and families. The book has chapters devoted to the current status of state and federal statues pertaining to gifted children, the process involved in taking legal action on behalf of a gifted child, a review of cases involving gifted children and their education, and other kinds of legal issues that may involve consideration of giftedness, e.g., custody. Several chapters are devoted to describing due process and mediation. The last chapter is very interesting and addresses potential future issues in gifted education which may end up in the courts such as whether state law may limit the age at which a student can enter a post-secondary institution.
back to top


Musically Gifted

  • Kindling the Spark. Recognizing and Developing Musical Talent
    Joanne Hartounian
    Oxford Press, 2002.

    This is a comprehensive look at musical talent and its development. The author covers perspectives on musical talent (as aptitude, as intelligence, as performance, as creativity, as giftedness), recognizing musical talent, and developing musical talent (early development to the teenage years). This book is a must for any music educator but would also be helpful to parents with a musically talented child.

  • Talent Children and Adults. Third Edition.
    Jane Piirto
    Prufrock Press, 2007.

    This is a very comprehensive look at the field of gifted education and creativity. The book is 730 pages long and contains 12 chapters. Perspectives on definitions of intelligence and theories of giftedness and creativity are covered as well as common practice in identifying giftedness and creativity. Piirto then proceeds to deal with each stage of development, young gifted children, giftedness during the elementary and middle school years, high school and college aged gifted students and adult giftedness. In the discussion of each phase, she organizes the presentation of material by domains or areas of giftedness including music, visual arts, writing and leadership.Two chapters deal with curriculum for the gifted and differentiation and there are chapters devoted to social emotional issues and special populations of gifted learners. This book emphasizes breadth of topics covered rather than depth and is an excellent resource for beginning students in the field.

back to top


Parenting Gifted Students

  • Being Smart about Gifted Children. A Guidebook for Parents and Educators
    Dona J. Matthews and Joanne F. Foster
    Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press, 2004.

    This is a book written for parents and it covers a wide variety of topics about gifted children including conceptions of gitedness, creativity testing and assessment, identification and labeling issues, educational programs within school and outside of school, motivation, emotional and social issues and development,and cultural differences and learning problems among gifted children. The book is long (about 400 pages) but comprehensive and written in an easy, informative style appropriate for non educators. Despite its length it is palatable because it is filled with vignettes of gifted children and the authors frequently give practical suggestions for parents. Especially helpful chapters include the ones on emotional, social and behavioral concerns, development of gifted children, and adapting to program or school changes. This book is recommended for parents who want to a broad view of many issues concerning gifted children.

  • Freeing Our Families from Perfectionism
    Thomas S. Greenspon
    Free Spirit Publishing, 2002.
    This easy, informal read discusses how perfectionism can manifest itself in children. Some of the symptoms of perfectionism may be counterintuitive and include procrastination and lack of risk-taking–both due to a fear of failure or imperfection. They also include stress, anxiety, excessive competitiveness and criticism of others, and compulsive planning. The author provides a checklist of perfectionistic behaviors in three areas–actions, thoughts and feelings. Greenspon then traces the roots of perfectionism. Contributors include dysfunction in the family, neglect, criticism from parents and adults, unrealistic expectations and excessive praise. Greenspon emphasizes that children form beliefs and "emotional convictions" regarding what they must accomplish to be accepted by parents or how to please them based on their experiences in the home. Beliefs that you are never good enough, or that love and acceptance depend on achievement, lead to perfectionism. Creating a home environment that does not foster perfectionism requires that parents reflect on their own experiences as children and then come to terms with the messages they received from their own parents regarding their worth, abilities and achievement. Greenspon offers suggestions to help parents mitigate perfectionism. Ideas include giving support and encouragement to children rather than praise or criticism, showing your child that you cherish him or her as a unique individual, avoiding comparisons with other children and expressing appreciation to your child for his or her contributions to the family. Greenspon also advises parents to let go of power struggles with their child and to connect through empathy. Greenspon includes many helpful anecdotes throughout the eleven chapters. He also has brief"Talk it Over" sections within each chapter, which include specific suggestions and ideas for addressing emotional issues surrounding perfectionism with your child. Another useful component featured is a section called "Make a Note of It," which offers experiments and questions to help parents reflect on their actions, responses and feelings. Finally, Greenspon offers resources including other books for parents on other important child-rearing issues and ways to find professional counseling.
  • Genius Denied: How to Stop Wasting our Brightest Young Minds
    Jan & Bob Davidson
    Simon & Schuster, 2004.
    Written by the founders of the Davidson Institute for Talent Development, this book sheds light on the failure of our nation's public schools to adequately educate gifted students. Genius Denied makes the compelling argument that while school districts are required to “leave no child behind,” the needs of our most talented students are being overlooked.
    According to this book, most of the 29 states with funding for gifted programs are not specialized to address and develop the academic needs of highly gifted children. Also, in the midst of major federal and state initiatives to provide funding for low performing schools and children with disabilities, virtually no new funding is available for gifted and talented programming. The authors argue that the quest for equity in schools should aim to provide all children with “an education appropriate to their abilities - one that challenges them and helps them grow.”
    Genius Denied describes this “quiet crisis” in education with colorful examples and well -supported statistics, but it does not leave the reader hopeless. The book provides parents and educators with suggestions for how to overcome these inadequacies in the current educational system. The Davidsons use real life scenarios to teach parents about becoming their child's advocate, seeking out supplemental educational services, and finding mentors for their children. They discuss ways in which teachers, mentors and parents can work together to create more challenging academic programs in schools.
    The Davidsons argue that continued failure to address the needs of the nation's brightest students means a loss of potential in a country that depends on talented people to continue its forward progress. This book provides an eloquent illustration on this national problem complete with an inspiring set of action steps that can ultimately lead to a solution.

     

  • How to Parent So Children Will Learn
    Sylvia Rimm
    New York, NY: Three Rivers Press, 1996
    This is an excellent resource for parents. Dr. Rimm is a well known psychologist who shares her wisdom regarding how to parent to promote achievement in children. The book contains three large chapters. The first chapter deals with how parents can promote positive behaviors in their children through the effective use of praise, rewards and punishment, and limit setting. The author discusses how children can fall into patterns of dependence and how parents can promote appropriate self-sufficiency through their parenting. The second chapter is entitled "United Parenting" and deals with patterns of power and interaction between parents and children and how this affects children's achievement. I found this chapter very very interesting and useful. Rimm explains how parents can thwart their children's achievement by undermining each other in ways that they don't even realize. Special sections deal with the problems that uniquely affect single parents and adoptive parents.
    The third chapter deals with teaching children how to acquire and develop skills such as organization, time management, study skills, etc., that promote achievement. Through out the book, there are examples and anecdotes that illustrate the content. Each chapter also contains questions from parents with Rimm's advice. I found these to be realistic and very helpful.
  • Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child
    John Gottman & Joan DeClaire
    New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997
  • Saunders, J. and Espeland, P
    Bringing Out the Best.
    Minneapolis: Free Spirit Publishing, 1991.
  • The Survival Guide for Parents of Gifted Kids: How to Uncerstand, Live With, and Stick Up for Your Gifted Child.
    Sally Yahnke Walker
    Minneapolis: Free Spirit Publishing, 2002.
back to top


Planning Ahead

  • College Planning for Gifted Students (2nd ed.)
    Berger, Sandra
    Reston, VA: The Council for Exceptional Children, 1994.
  • Early Entrance to College. A Guide to Success
    Michelle C. Muratori
    Prufrock Press; Waco, TX, 2007

    This book is written for parents and students who are trying to decide if early entrance to college is a viable option for them. The author covers every aspect of early college entrance including its history, typical parental concerns, issues to consider before choosing early entrance, other options besides early college entrance for gifted students, how to prepare for early entrance, how to make a smooth transition to college, and what to do if early college entrance turns out not to be the right choice. Interspersed throughout are anecdotes from students and parents and a significant portion of the book is devoted to descriptions of existing early college entrance programs. This book is also a helpful guide for individuals who are in the position of counseling gifted students and their families regarding educational programs and options.

  • What Teens Need to Succeed: Proven Practical Ways To Shape Your Own Future.
    Benson, P., Galbraith, J., & Espeland, P.
    Minneapolis, Free Spirit Publishing, 1998.
back to top


Preschool Aged Gifted Children

  • Gifted Young Children
    Wendy Conklin Roedell, Nancy Eowald Jackson and Halbert B. Robinson
    New York: Teachers College Press, Columbia University, 1980
    This book is old but it is timeless. It contains one of the best reviews of the research literature on the families, physical development, social and emotional development and patterns of intellectual abilities of young children. It is recommended for those with an interest in the research issues surrounding young gifted children.
  • Parents Nurturing Math-Talented Young Children
    Barbara Waxman, Nancy M. Robinson, and Swampna Mukhopadhayay
    Halbert Robinson Center for Capabable Youth, Seattle WA, CAPABLE@u.washington.edu.
    This book gives an overview of the behavioral manifestations of early ability in mathematics. The results of a major research study conducted at the University of Washington is presented (easily digested by parents). The authors also review various alternatives in meeting the needs of math-advanced children including acceleration and strategies within the classroom.
  • Teachers Nurturing Math-Talented Young Children
    Barbara Waxman, Nancy M. Robinson, and Swampna Mukhopadhayay
    Published and available from the Halbert Robinson Center for Capabable Youth, Seattle WA, CAPABLE@u.washington.edu
    This is the educators version of the book listed above. It presents in detail the Math Trek curriculum which was used in the Center for Capable Youth study of preschoolers talented in mathematics. There is a focus on curriculum, instructional strategies. Several profiles of students are included.
  • Teaching Young Gifted Children in the Regular Classroom
    Joan Franklin Smutny, Sally Yahnke Walker, and Elizabeth A. Meckstroth
    Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Press, 1997.
    This is a good book for educators and is oriented specifically towards the classroom teacher. It contains chapters on identifying preschool aged gifted children, creating a learning environment, compacting and extending the curriculum, promoting creativity and imagination and understanding children's emotional need. It also contains reproducible forms for teachers.
back to top


Social-Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Children

  • Perfectionism: What's Bad About Being Good?
    Adderholt-Elliot, M.
    Minneapolis: Free Spirit Publishing, 1987.
  • The Handbook of Secondary Gifted Education
    Felicia A. Dixon and Sidney M Moon
    2006, Prufrock Press, Waco, Texas

    This book is a comprehensive look at both the development of gifted adolescents and the options available for their talent development. There are chapters devoted to the unique psychological and social-emotional issues of adolescence such as identity formation, career development, and how these are traversed by gifted students and particularly special populations of gifted adolescents including students of color, students with learning disabilities and gifted females. Other chapters discuss the talent development process in various domains including sports, the visual arts, and academic domains. There are chapters devoted to various curricular areas and what schools can do within these to develop the abilities of gifted adolescents as well as chapters on various program options currently available including special schools and extra-curricular options. Finally, the last section of this comprehensive book looks at teacher education and professional development for teachers who work with gifted adolescents. This book is comprehensive but written at a level for even newcomers to the field. It is recommended for teachers, adminstrators and parents as well.

  • A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students. Templeton National Report on Acceleration
    Eds. Colangelo, Nicholas; Assouline, Susan; Gross, Miraca U.M.
    Belin-Blank Center for Gifteddcaon & Talent Development, 2004.
    More than just grade skipping, “acceleration means matching the level, complexity, and pace of the curriculum with the readiness and motivation of the student.” Endorsed by the National Association for Gifted Children, this two-part report on acceleration is an impressive achievement. The report provides accurate, research-based information about acceleration to those who most need it-parents, teachers, school administrators, and public policy-makers. It draws on the expertise of many of today's top experts in gifted education, pointing out that accelerating gifted students is strongly supported by those who have studied the practice. American educators, on the other hand, commonly are reluctant to consider acceleration as an option. Attempting to bridge the divide between these two positions, the authors outline some reasons why bright students in this country are “held back,” or not allowed to move through the curriculum at a rate that is appropriate for them, including:
    • Philosophy that children must be kept with their age group
    • Belief that acceleration hurries children out of childhood
    • Fear that acceleration hurts children socially
    • Political concerns about equity

    For further information, to give your own opinion on the report, or to download the entire report for free, visit www.nationdeceived.org.

  • Acceleration for Gifted Learners, K-5
    Joan Franklin Smutney, Sally Y. Walker, and Elizabeth A. Meckstroth
    Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2007

    This book is a very practical guide to the topic of acceleration for teachers and school personnel who work with children of elementary school age. The authors share their expertise in early childhood development, gifted programming, and the social-emotional development of gifted children through the anecdotes and examples sprinkled throughout the text. The book broadens one's notions of the types of acceleration available to teachers and schools and how to effectively implement acceleration within the classroom via differentiated content, thinking strategies, products, and policy. An entire section of the book deals with the gifted child's personality and the social-emotional aspects of acceleration. This book is best for teachers and administrators but also appropriate for parents.

  • Before the Gates of Excellence. The Determinants of Creative Genius.
    R. Ochse
    Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1990.
    This book presents research about eminent individuals - those who produce creative, ground breaking work in their domain of talent. The book examines theories of creativity as well as the families and early environments of creative producers. A main focus of the book is the motivation to achieve at high levels and the factors that determine or produce this. The book is recommended for serious students of creativity.
  • Being Gifted in School
    Tracy L. Cross and Larry J. Coleman
    Prufrock Press, Waco, TX, 2000.
    This is a very comprehensive book about research, theory and practices in gifted education. While it is a general text, it is probably not for newcomers to the field. The book is very rich in research and resources. Chapters cover theories of giftedness, identification, the gifted child's families, counseling issues, curriculum, instructional theory, teaching methods, etc. The authors give not just the research about each issue or practice they present, but the assumptions underlying them. The chapters on the family, the lives of gifted individuals, creativity and theories of giftedness are especially thought provoking. This book would be most appropriate for educators who have some experience in the field and have done some reading of literature and research in gifted education.
  • Counseling the Gifted and Talented
    Linda Kreger Silverman
    Denver, CO: Love Publishing Co., 1993.
    This book deals comprehensively with counseling issues that arise with gifted children including the characteristics of the gifted that often require special assistance or intervention, e. g. perfectionism, intense emotions, feelings of being different. The authors outline intervention and treatment strategies and options and deal with special populations such as gifted females or gifted minority students. This book is recommended for parents and educators.
  • Handbook of Gifted Education (Second Edition)
    Nicholas Colangelo and Gary A. Davis (eds)
    Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, 1997.
  • Mom, They’re Teasing Me: Helping Your Child Solve Social Problems
    M. Thompson and L. J. Cohen, with C. O’Neill Grace
    New York: Balantine Books, 2002.
    Should I help my child resolve his problems with his peers? Is my child is “normal”? Will she grow out of this social problem? Why are children at this age so cruel, insensitive, or reckless?The authors of this book, which include two psychologists and a former middle-school teacher, vividly portray the complex world of children’s social interactions, from preschoolers to young adults. Using a format that includes both case studies and extensive question-and-answer segments, the book examines social problems which may seem only too familiar to parents, such as shy children; victimized children, and children who torment or ostracize others. The book is divided into three sections: normal social pain, children at risk, and school/neighborhood problems. The authors explain that “normal” social pain, while very real and deserving of adults’ attention, is unlikely to have serious long-term consequences such as mental illness or violence. Parents and teachers should seek to address this sort of pain by deliberately teaching leadership and conflict resolution skills, as well as fostering moral environments where kindness and compassion are valued. On the other hand, adults need to recognize that some children experiencing social pain are in real danger: “Children who are systematically rejected or neglected or aggressive are at a much higher risk for dropping out of school, drug and alcohol problems, depression, criminal behavior, and even suicide.” (p. xvi). Finally, the authors emphasize that children’s social problems generally involve “complex interactions between the individual and the group.” Parents concerned about their child might well find answers to specific questions in this book. Other adults, however, can use this book to gain understanding of the stresses and rewards of the social world children navigate every day. The authors’ conversational style makes it an accessible (yet research-based) introduction to the topic for the general reader.
  • Planning and Implementing Programs for the Gifted
    James H. Borland
    Hewy York: Teachers College Press, Columbia University, 1989
  • Smart Girls Gifted Women
    Barbara A. Kerr
    Dayton, OH: Ohio Psychology Press, 1991.
    This book is a classic on gifted females. The author conducted a study of her female classmates in a gifted program. Her results highlight the special obstacles that females face and suggests some possible solutions. This book is very readable and would be helpful to parents, educators, and even teens.
  • Smart Girls Two
    Barbara A Kerr
    Dayton, OH: Ohio Psychology Press, 1994
    This book deals with the reasons why so many young women fail to live up to their potential. It deals with issues that confront girls throughout their development - from early childhood to motherhood and family. Like its predecessor above, this book is very readable and is recommended for parents, educators, teens and young adults.
  • Talent Children and Adults. Third Edition
    Jean Piirto
    Prufrock Press, 2007

    This is a very comprehensive look at the field of gifted education and creativity. The book is 730 pages long and contains 12 chapters. Perspectives on definitions of intelligence and theories of giftedness and creativity are covered as well as common practice in identifying giftedness and creativity. Piirto then proceeds to deal with each stage of development, young gifted children, giftedness during the elementary and middle school years, high school and college aged gifted students and adult giftedness. In the discussion of each phase, she organizes the presentation of material by domains or areas of giftedness including music, visual arts, writing and leadership.Two chapters deal with curriculum for the gifted and differentiation and there are chapters devoted to social emotional issues and special populations of gifted learners. This book emphasizes breadth of topics covered rather than depth and is an excellent resource for beginning students in the field.

  • The Gifted Kids Survival Guide: A Teen Handbook
    Galbraith, J.
    Minneapolis, Free Spirit Publishing, 1996.
  • The Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children. What Do We Know?
    Maureen Niehart, Sally M. Reis, Nancy M. Robinson, Sidney M. Moon (eds.)
    A Publication of the National Association of Gifted Children, Washington, D.C.: Prufrock Press, Inc., 2002
    This publication of the National Association for Gifted Children compiles 24 chapters written by leading researchers of the social-emotional development of gifted children. Chapters explore subjects including perfectionism, underachievement, depression, delinquency, risk and resilience, peer pressure and social acceptance among gifted students. It also addresses specific populations within the community of gifted youth. Categories include the special concerns of girls, of boys, students with learning disabilities or AD/HD, the creatively gifted, and gifted children who are gay, lesbian, or bisexual. Chapters review and present research relevant to each topic. Authors carefully distinguish fact from fiction regarding the social-emotional and psychological characteristics of gifted children. They stress, for example, that there is little research to suggest that gifted students are psychologically or emotionally vulnerable because of their gifts. However, gifted students may be at risk because of the frequent disparity between their cognitive abilities and their educational program. This book is a comprehensive resource, appropriate for both parents and educators.
  • Understanding Those Who Create
    Jane Piirto
    Dayton, OH: Ohio Psychology Press, 1992.
    This is an excellent book for those who are interested in, yet new to the field of creativity. The author starts out by dealing with definitions and assessments of creativity and then goes on to present research about the characteristics of creative individuals within various fields such as visual artists, creative writers, creative scientists, mathematicians, musicians, and composers. This book is recommended for educators and parents.
  • When Gifted Kids Don't Have All the Answers.
    Jim Delisle and Judy Galbraith
    Free Spirit Press, Minneapolis, MN.
    This is a great resource for parents and teachers on the emotional needs of gifted kids. It is written in a very easy, informal style yet is packed with information that is research based. The authors deal with the basics such as what is giftedness, identifying giftedness, being a teacher of the gifted, and the emotional and psychological characteristics of gifted kids. This book is peppered with illuminating, interesting anecdotes and the thoughts and ideas of gifted kids about being gifted. That is the book's strength--it is written from the perspective of gifted children. Highly recommended reading for anyone new to the field.
back to top


The Highly Gifted

  • Before the Gates of Excellence. The Determinants of Creative Genius
    R. Ochse
    Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1990
    This book presents research about eminent individuals - those who produce creative, ground-breaking work in their domain of talent. The book examines theories of creativity as well as the families and early environments of creative producers. A main focus of the book is the motivation to achieve at high levels and the factors that determine or produce this. The book is recommended for serious students of creativity.
  • Developing Talent in Young People
    Benjamin S. Bloom
    New York: Ballantine Books, 1985.
    Although over 20 years old, this book is a classic. It includes the results of in-depth interviews with individuals gifted in music, art, athletics, science and mathematics and their families. These individuals attained a level or recognized excellence within their fields. The book focuses on the family life and teachers of the gifted individuals. This book is recommended for parents and educators.
  • Exceptionally Gifted Children, second edition
    Miraca Gross
    Routledge Falmer, 2004
    This book is about profoundly gifted children. Gross conducted a longitudinal study of a small group of Australian children with IQs greater than 160. The book focuses mainly on the school experiences of these children. Gross gives the results of her research study on these children within the context of previous research. Thus the book is an excellent meshing of previous research and literature on issues such as self esteem, acceleration, psycho-social development and her findings for the profoundly gifted children she studied. I would recomend this book for parents of highly gifted children and educators as well.
  • Gifted Children. Myths and Realities
    Ellen Winner
    New York: Basic Books,1996.
    This book addresses nine myths about giftedness including the myth of global giftedness, the myth regarding the driving parent, the myth regarding glowing psychological health, and the myth that all gifted children become creative adults. Subsequent chapters deal in depth with each of the myths. This is not a book for a newcomer to the field, but someone who has some background, parent or educator.
  • Lives of Promise. What Becomes of High School Valedictorians
    Karen D. Arnold
    San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1995
    This book compiles the results of a longitudinal study of a group of valedictorians. The book focuses on their paths from the time of graduation from high school to their early thirties. The book is fascinating, particularly in what it reveals about the trajectories of females and minority individuals. This book is recommended for educators and parents.
  • Nature's Gambit. Child Prodigies and the Development of Human Potential
    David Henry Feldman
    New York: Basic Books, 1986
    This is the definitive book on child prodigies. The authors give several interesting and detailed profiles of prodigies and discuss the issues surrounding prodigious achievement, e. g. domains that produce prodigies, teachers, social and emotional issues, etc. This is an excellent book for educators and parents alike.
back to top


Under Achievement in Gifted Students

  • Reversing Underachievement Among Gifted Black Students. Promising Practices and Programs.
    Donna Y. Ford
    1996 Teachers College Press, NY.
    Ford begins her book with an examination of definitions. The first chapter looks at definitions of giftedness and their implication for the identification of gifted Black students. The second chapter similarly explores definitions of underachievement. Subsequent chapters addresses many facet of underachievement in gifted Black students including motivation, beliefs about achievement, school factors, cultural issues, psychological factors and family factors. Ford devotes the last two chapters to potential solutions to the problem of underachievement among Black students including a review of promising practices gleaned from the Javits projects and directors for future research.
  • The Myth of Laziness: America’s Top Expert Shows How Kids -and Parents- Can Become More Productive.
    Mel Levine, M.D.
    Simon & Schuster: New York. 2003.
    “I know you’re smart! So why can’t you . . .” Dr. Mel Levine argues in this book that kids displaying what educators call “underachievement” should never be labeled “lazy.” Levine outlines a set of hidden handicaps, involving neurodevelopmental areas such as motor function, memory, language, and organization, that keep children from the productive output they are capable of. Levine is a holistic clinician, collecting evidence from children’s social, emotional, school, and family lives as well as from educational and neurological testing. Similarly, his recommendations for remediation run the gamut from school accommodations to suggestions about the type of extracurricular activities the child might experience success in. A particularly interesting section of the book profiles a family in which parents have poised their children for success in school, suggesting ways to structure family life for high academic achievement. Levine also turns his attention to how schools could do a better job of fostering “output” in their students. Both parents and teachers who have wondered why a child shows a gap between ability and productivity will benefit from this accessible, elegantly written book.
back to top