2018 Keynote Address

Supporting Your Gifted Child's School Performance: Identifying and Meeting the Special Learning Challenges of Gifted Children

Steve ZeckerDr. Steven G. Zecker will discuss factors which can adversely impact school achievement, and help us learn how to identify them. Dr. Zecker will also cover the factors which contribute to academic success, and discuss how awareness of these factors can allow parents and other caregivers to provide a supportive learning environment.

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Parent Session Descriptions

2018 Keynote Address
Session Title: Supporting Your Gifted Child’s School Performance: Identifying and Meeting the Special Learning Challenges of Gifted Children

Time: 1 pm – 2:45 pm

Presenter: Steven G. Zecker

Despite an above average level of mental ability and adequate motivation to learn, many high functioning children struggle with aspects of school performance. Unfortunately, many schools today do not do an adequate job of addressing the needs of these children.  In his talk he will discuss the factors that can adversely impact school achievement and how to identify them.  He will also discuss factors that contribute to academic success and how heightened awareness of these factors can allow parents and other caregivers to provide a maximally supportive learning environment that will benefit children academically. 

Steven G. Zecker, PhD is an Associate Professor in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Northwestern University, where he has been on the faculty for 32 years.  He earned his MA and PhD degrees in Cognitive Psychology at Wayne State University and spent five years teaching in Psychology Departments at Hamilton College and Colgate University in New York before coming to Northwestern's Program in Learning Disabilities.  While at Northwestern he became licensed as a clinical psychologist and has been actively involved in departmental clinical activities, including supervision of the LD diagnostic clinic, for the past three decades.  He also maintains a private practice in which he conducts diagnostic evaluations.  Dr. Zecker’s research has resulted in over 75 publications and more than 100 presentations at professional meeting.  His current research interests focus on the roles of attention and auditory processing in reading development.  

Dr. Zecker has taught a wide range of graduate and undergraduate courses, with topics including ADHD, reading disorder, tests and measurements, math disabilities, statistics and sound processing, among others.  He also frequently speaks to groups of teachers and other professionals and has given talks to such groups in a number of countries (including Taiwan, Hong Kong, Thailand, Argentina and England) and more than 25 U.S. states during his career.  Dr. Zecker also serves as a disability consultant to two Chicago-area private schools for students with learning disabilities and to three national standardized testing agencies.


Session Title
: How You Can Help Your Gifted Children Find the College That’s Right for Them

Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: F. Sheppard Shanley

Your high school aged children will spend a lot of time looking at different colleges, as they try to decide where to apply. For them, the college application process will start long before they start to work on the actual applications for admission. It will start with research about college, Many students and their parents travel to see colleges and  universities to see which ones feel right. Parents will be part of the discussion from the beginning, and it won’t be just ‘where can you get in’. We will cover different points that parents talk about with their sons and daughters who are trying to find the colleges that will be right for them.

F. Sheppard Shanley, Senior Associate Director, Undergraduate Admissions, Northwestern University, recruits and reviews applications for U.S. and international students applying to Northwestern University. He has worked for University Admissions for more than four decades, and is frequently consulted for articles about college admission procedures. Shanley has previously taught Advanced Placement® U.S. History and Advanced Placement European History courses.


Session Title
: The Learning, Developing Brain: Myths and Facts 

Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Elizabeth S. Norton

Do we really only use 10% of our brains? Does it matter if we read on a page or on a screen? In this session, we will discuss some of the truths and common misconceptions and about the brain basis of learning and cognitive abilities during childhood and adolescence. Dr. Norton, a developmental cognitive neuroscientist, will also present on current understanding of the brain differences that are associated with giftedness and intellectual ability.

Elizabeth Norton, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Director of the Language, Education and Reading Neuroscience (LEARN) Lab. Her research investigates the brain and behavioral basis of language and reading development and disorders, particularly early identification of disorders such as dyslexia, developmental language disorder, and autism. She uses EEG/ERP and MRI brain imaging methodologies to investigate these questions in infants, toddlers, and children. Collaborations include studies of developmentally-sensitive measures of premature infants’ brain development, indicators of mental health and its relations with language, and intervention for cardiovascular health. Dr. Norton also serves as Co-Director of the Neurodevelopmental Resource Core within the Northwestern Institute for Innovations in Developmental Sciences (DevSci).


Session Title
: Help your Gifted Children Improve Their Coping and Problem-Solving Skills

Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm 

Presenters: Jana Sarno and Fumi Horner

Jana Sarno, MA, BCBA, is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) with educational, clinical, and professional development experience in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis. She earned her Bachelor of Science from Western Michigan University. Following graduation from WMU, Jana attended The University of Southern Mississippi and earned her Master of Arts degree in Psychology. During her time at USM, she worked with children enrolled in Head Start/Early Head Start, local school districts, and a multi-disciplinary setting for children with communication and developmental disorders. After her time at USM, Jana completed a year-long internship experience at the Marcus Autism Center, a NIH Autism Center of Excellence in Atlanta, GA. While at Marcus, Jana received intensive clinical experience in the assessment and treatment of severe problem behavior, verbal behavior, and feeding disorders. Finally, Jana serves as the Operations Coordinator for the Illinois Association for Behavior Analysis. 

Fumi Takagi Horner, PhD is a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst (BCBA-D) with extensive experience and passion for working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their families. She earned her Bachelor of Arts from University California, Irvine in Psychology and Social Behavior and PhD degree in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) from The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Her doctoral dissertation focused on language development across different cultures. She specializes in ASD and related disorders, ABA programming (including Verbal Behavior, feeding, and toilet training), staff and parent training, school consultation, and teaching/disseminating ABA. Finally, Dr. Horner serves as Adjunct Faculty at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. 

Session Descriptions for Grades 9-12

Session Title: Ahead of the Curve: Using the Engineering Methods to Define Problems in New Ways

Session Time: 1 pm to 1:45 pm

Presenter: Alex Randhava

Session Description: How are the problems of the past so visible to our eyes, but so hidden from those who lived in that era?  What inefficiencies, cruelties or blindness will people in 2118 perceive about our time?  Students will examine a deadly traffic accident to gain an understanding of how solutions stem from our definition of the problem.  We will use this experience to look forward, trying to avoid the maxim that reform only follows tragedy.


Session Title
Forensic Entomology

Session Time: 1 pm to 1:45 pm

Presenter: Monty Adams

Session Description: What are the first insects to arrive at a dead body?  How do we tell how long they have been there?  Why do they give reliable clues to determining the time since death? Students will determine the time since death by examining insect evidence.


Session Title
: Where Are They Now? CTD Alumni Panel

Session Time: 2 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenters: CTD Alumni

Session Description: Join a panel of CTD Alumni to find out about the range of inspiring careers in which they are now working, to learn more about the pathways they took, and to learn about the skills (learned inside and outside the classroom) they found most useful to their success. 


Session Title
Exploring 3-D Medical Imaging Technology

Session Time: 2 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenter: Chad Haney

Session Description: Ever wanted to visualize and manipulate a life size 3D image of a molecule? Learn how scientists advance medicine with technology in this interactive session. Participants will tour Northwestern University’s cutting edge facility, the Center for Advanced Molecular Imaging, and view state-of-the art medical imaging technology including Northwestern’s own, first-of-its-kind, advanced 3D visualization wall display. 


Session Title:
 Study Abroad Panel

Session Time: 3 pm to 3:45 pm

Presenters: Panel of Northwestern University Students

Session Description: In this panel presentation, current and former Northwestern University students will share their experiences in study abroad programs. Each panelist will describe how they made the decision to study abroad, why they chose a particular country, how they prepared for travel, and what academic subjects they studied while abroad. Participants are encouraged to ask questions of this well-traveled group!


Session Title:
 What is the First Year of College Really Like?

Session Time: 3 pm to 3:45 pm

Presenter: Panel of Northwestern University Students

Session Description: In this interactive panel discussion, participants will discover what the college experience is really like from current college students! Northwestern students will share their hard-earned wisdom, and will answer questions about what to expect from the first year of college.


Session Title
Materializing Your Future: Careers in Materials Science 

Session Time: 4 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Matthew Peters

Session Description: Materials science is a fast-growing field, and this interactive session will introduce you to this new wave of science innovations and outline the educational and career possibilities in this exciting field of science. Participants will learn how materials scientists view the world around them. Discover the properties of a variety of materials, including an exploration of liquid nitrogen-activated superconductors! 


Session Title
: Powers of Ten: The Artist and the Architect – Learning form Ray and Charles Eames

Session Time: 4 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Odile Compagnon

Session Description: Learn the importance of dimensions and scale in design through the work of Ray and Charles Eames who worked together and developed design methods that could be applied to objects, buildings, landscapes and urban plans. Participants will end the session by designing their own environmental maps. 

Session Descriptions for Grades 7-8

Session Title: NetLogo: Understanding the world around us through developing computational models

Session Time: 1 pm to 2:45pm

Presenter: Umit Aslan

Session Description: Why are fast-food restaurants often very close to each other? Why do some forest fires burn out while others persist? What viral marketing strategies are effective for Twitter? Computational modeling helps scientists, economists, health care professionals, and others more deeply understand such complex questions about the social and natural worlds. In this hands-on workshop, we will learn the basics of the NetLogo agent-based modeling environment, create our own computational models and analyze the data our models produce in order to understand the world around us more deeply.


Session Title
: Pop-up Architecture: Folds and Tensegrity

Session Time: 1 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenter: Odile Compagnon

Session Description: Learn some of the structural principles of architecture by looking at the work of Buckminster Fuller and of architects who were influenced by him. Participants will construct self-supporting assemblies, using rods and wires and draw imaginary contexts in which the structures can be used.


Session Title
: Projectile Motion: It’s (Not) Rocket Science! 

Session Time: 1 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenter: Matthew Peters

Session Description: Ever wonder how we landed a man on the moon or how SpaceX is able to land a first-stage rocket? The secret to these engineering feats lies in mathematical equations that describe the movement of flying objects. During this session, participants will learn how to use this math to launch their own paper rockets and calculate the velocity, range, and height they achieve. Participants will then use this knowledge to design a launch setup to reliably hit a target, just like real aerospace engineers. Come and learn that rocket science isn’t “rocket science”!

 

Session Title: Projectile Motion: It’s (Not) Rocket Science! (Session 2)

Session Time: 1 pm to 2:45 pm

Presenter: Kazi Sadman

Session Description: Ever wonder how we landed a man on the moon or how SpaceX is able to land a first-stage rocket? The secret to these engineering feats lies in mathematical equations that describe the movement of flying objects. During this session, participants will learn how to use this math to launch their own paper rockets and calculate the velocity, range, and height they achieve. Participants will then use this knowledge to design a launch setup to reliably hit a target, just like real aerospace engineers. Come and learn that rocket science isn’t “rocket science”!


Session Title
: Space and Astrophysics

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter:  Zach Hafen

Session Description: How do planets form, and how many planets are orbiting other stars? How do supermassive black holes expand? What kinds of galaxies are out there in our Cosmos? Engaging in hands-on activities, young astronomers help to investigate these questions. Students learn about what makes astronomy a difficult, but exciting field, and the innovations that are helping to make it easier. 


Session Title
: Forensic Hair Comparison

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45pm

Presenter: Monty Adams

Session Description: What information can be gained from hair analysis and what are the limitations? Students will be guided through microscopic examination of hair to learn how hair varies from one person to another, and will also compare animal to human hair.


Session Title
: Monsoon: Engineering for Flash Floods

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Alex Randhava

Session Description: The South Indian monsoon is delivering more precipitation than cities can handle.  Engineers face daunting challenges in their attempts to alleviate the monsoon's flash flooding, while also confronting the unique challenges of Indian mega-cities.  Students will progress through four steps of the engineering method to battle this problem.  They will  define the problem, use an understanding of local conditions to establish the right criteria for a good design, prototype, and then test.  

 

Session TitleMonsoon: Engineering for Flash Floods (Session 2)

Session Time: 3 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Elizabeth Copper

Session Description: The South Indian monsoon is delivering more precipitation than cities can handle.  Engineers face daunting challenges in their attempts to alleviate the monsoon's flash flooding, while also confronting the unique challenges of Indian mega-cities.  Students will progress through four steps of the engineering method to battle this problem.  They will  define the problem, use an understanding of local conditions to establish the right criteria for a good design, prototype, and then test.  

Session Descriptions for Grades 4-6

Session Title: The Science of the Design Process

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Deniz Alpay

Session Description: Learn how design solutions can change the lives of your peers! Human centered design always begins with a "how-might-we" question; allowing us to stay centered in the challenges we want to tackle. In this hands-on workshop, we will be asking "How might we enable students with disabilities to have an accessible and inclusive classroom experience?"

Students will experience first-hand what it means to be part of a design team that sprints through cycles of research, prototyping, and testing. They will learn key principles of human centered design by the constructionist method of project-based-learning; where the project is to tackle an accessibility challenge for students with disabilities. In addition to practicing the design techniques and gaining the relevant skills, students will also get better at team building and constructive argumentation skills. The workshop will kick-off with some improv exercises that the students can try in any other teamwork context.


Session Title
: A Little Off the Spleen, Please! The History of Medicine from Barbers to Bots

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Kori Milroy

Session Description: What is medicine, and how has it changed throughout human history? This course will take students back in time to examine how humans healed one another from ancient and medieval times through modern times. Join us as we examine evidence of ancient surgery by looking at photos of fossilized human remains, develop a timeline of medical breakthroughs throughout history, compare ancient and medieval cures to modern cures, with a focus on cures that are still in use today and design and build a surgical instrument out of everyday materials. 


Session Title
: Environmental Science, Engineering, and Sustainability

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Rashida Clark

Session Desciption: How can science and engineering be used to solve society’s environmental challenges?  Plan and carry out investigations, analyze and interpret data, construct explanations and design solutions for society’s challenges. Develop and use models, support explanations through evidence, and practice communicating scientific information.

 

Session TitleEnvironmental Science, Engineering, and Sustainability (Session 2)

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Mara Dobrov

Session Desciption: How can science and engineering be used to solve society’s environmental challenges?  Plan and carry out investigations, analyze and interpret data, construct explanations and design solutions for society’s challenges. Develop and use models, support explanations through evidence, and practice communicating scientific information.


Session Title
: Order in the Courtroom

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter:  Robert Lang

Session Description: A mix of speaking and writing activities prepare you to take on the roles of lawyer, witness, juror, and storyteller. Develop advanced skills in oral argument, moral reasoning, mediation, conflict resolution, and the classic art of great storytelling.


Session Title
Tiny Chemistry: Introduction to Nanotechnology 

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Rustin Golnabi

Session Description: From smaller, more powerful phones to nano-bots making repairs at the cellular level in our bodies, nanotechnology is becoming an important field explored by scientists. At the nanometer-scale (one billionth of a meter!), materials start behaving entirely differently. By taking advantage of these unique properties, scientists and engineers are able to enter realms of science that have been thus far unreachable. In this entirely lab-based course, learn about the chemistry of nano-sized particles and the scientific and societal impacts of nanotechnology. Students will engage in hands-on chemistry by making their own nanoparticles and microcapsules and exploring observable effects at the nanoscale.


Session Title
Architectural Design: How Structures Stand and Bridges Span

Session Time: 1 pm to 4:45 pm

Presenter: Richard Kasemsarn

Session Description:  How do architects develop a sketch into a skyscraper? In this workshop, students will learn how architects draw, visualize, and problem solve within given design parameters. We will work on a design project that involves hands on scale model making. Participants will learn about some of the physics and engineering involved required to go from concept to construction. 

 

Activities for Age 4 - Grade 3 (full afternoon)

Children age 4 through grade 3 enjoy hands-on architecture and construction activities, modeled on CTD’s Summer Leapfrog Program.

Please note: parents attending the 1 pm keynote address may drop off children at the activity site at 12:30 pm.

Presenter Biographies for Student Sessions

Monty Adams, Forensic Scientist and Instructor, CTD

Forensic Entomology

Forensic Hair Comparison

Mr. Monty Adams (B.S., M.M., M.A.T.) worked as a forensic chemist and serologist for the Chicago Police Department Crime Lab and as a forensic serologist for the Illinois State Police Department of Forensic Services.  He later became an investigator for the Chicago Fire Department's Internal Affairs Unit. Mr. Adams has taught Biology and Chemistry at Evanston Township High School and is currently teaching Chemistry, Evolution, Health, and Forensic Science at Latino Youth High School in Chicago.  Mr. Adams has also taught courses in Biology, Chemistry, and Forensic Science at CTD, and has been teaching courses at CTD since 2006.


Deniz Alpay
, UX strategist, Graveflex

The Science of the Design Process

Deniz Alpay asks: how can we better communicate our thoughts across vastly different disciplines? Deniz has been curious about this question throughout her years as a research assistant when she teamed up with chemists, engineers, and patent attorneys to develop nanoparticles for cancer therapy. Now more focused on systems that are visible to the naked eye, Deniz is a user experience strategist at Graveflex; where she teams up with developers and visual designers to create purposeful products. Deniz earned her MS in Materials Science and Engineering from the McCormick School of Engineering and her MA in Learning Sciences from the School of Education and Social Policy, both at Northwestern University.


Umit Aslan
, PhD candidate in the School of Education and Social Policy and a member of the Center for Connected Learning and Computer-Based Modeling (CCL) of Northwestern University 

NetLogo: Understanding the world around us through developing computational models

Umit Aslan’s research interests include mathematics education, non-deterministic thinking, computer-based modeling and computer science education. Previously, he worked as a mathematics and computer science teacher in Turkey and founded a company that develops 3D video games for education. He also has a master’s degree in Mathematics and Science Education. He has developed and taught two CTD courses. 


Rashida Clark
, CTD instructor

Environmental Science, Engineering, and Sustainability

Rashida Clark has worked in the education sector for the past twenty years.  She has worked for education non-profit organizations, private schools, and charter schools in various positions.  She worked as director for an in-school health education program playing a major role in improving the quality of life for inner-city youth in Springfield, Massachusetts.  She has also taught elementary and secondary science courses at private and charter schools in Massachusetts, New York, and Illinois.  She holds a B.S. in Environmental Science, as well as, a M.S. Ed. in School Building Leadership.  She is an active member of the Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society in Education.  Currently, she works at an elementary school as a special projects director.  She has taught science-related courses for CTD for the last three years.


Odile Compagnon,
Architect, professor School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Odile Compagnon is an architect and a professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She earned her Architecture degree from the Ecole Nationale

Supérieure d’Architecture de Versailles in France. Odile’s professional practice as well as her research and work with students at SAIC are transdisciplinary. She is interested in involving her clients in the design as well as in the construction process. She is a founder of the Good City Group, which promotes collective participation in the reimagining of public spaces and infrastructures. The work she has done with theater companies and artists has permeated her architecture practice, which she sees as the coordination of a collaborative effort, allowing for many voices to be heard, and leaving some space and time for the unpredictable.

 

Elizabeth S. Copper, Teacher, Lindblom Math and Science Academy, Chicago.

Elizabeth S. Copper currently teaches Biology and Forensic sciences at Lindblom Math & Science Academy in Chicago, Illinois. She is in her 22nd  year of teaching. She is a 2013 Golden Apple recipient. Her assignments have been Life Science, Environmental Science and Honors Biology at the Middle School grade level.  She also teaches Honors Forensic science to high school students. Ms. Copper, chemical symbol Cu, also serves as her school’s High Science Fair Coordinator. She earned a Bachelor of Science in biology, from Mundelein College Chicago/Loyola University, Masters in Public Health from the University of Illinois, School of Public Health and a Masters of Education in Curriculum and Instruction from University of Illinois College of Education.  Ms. Copper has a Middle School Science certificate and is certified to teach K-9th grade and biological sciences.  Ms. Copper has taught Intro to Biomed in CTD’s Spectrum Program and is a CTD AWE instructor.


Mara Dobrov
, CTD Instructor

Environmental Science, Engineering and Sustainability II

Mara Dobrov joined the CTD staff as an instructor for the Weekend Enrichment Program this winter. Her many years of teaching science locally (Phys, Chem, Bio, Genetics, Env Science and A.P. Bio at St. Ignatius College Prep, West Town Academy, Loyola Academy) as well as working as a college instructor during doctoral studies at Cornell University (Neurobiology, Mammalian Physiology) have provided her rich experiences with students of various ages, talents and backgrounds. Working in both field and laboratory research has further enriched her education and deepened her passion for science: ‘chasing’ Humpbacks in Maui, Minke whales in the San Juan Islands, studying spinal regeneration in ancient vertebrates, working as an environmental consultant, testing models for learning in sea slugs and post-doctoral research on the neural development of motor systems in chick embryos.  She’s inspired to explore current issues in environmental science with young, curious minds and share with them her life-long love of learning!


Rustin Golnabi,
Materials Science PhD program, Northwestern University

Tiny Chemistry: Introduction to Nanoscience

Rustin Golnabi studied materials science with a concentration in nanomaterials at Johns Hopkins University. After graduation, he spent a summer teaching engineering concepts to high school students, and now he is in his third year in the Materials Science PhD program at Northwestern University. His research is in the development of techniques for nanolithography, or the synthesis and positioning of nanoparticles. Ultimately, he hopes to become a college professor and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers.


Zach Hafen
, PhD, Northwestern's Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics.

Space and Astrophysics

Zach Hafen is a PhD candidate at Northwestern's Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), where he spends his time exploring and understanding a virtual version of our universe. Within this virtual universe, he focuses on understanding where the atoms that make up our bodies come from, and beyond that where the atoms that make up all the stars in our galaxy come from. Zach earned a B.S. in Mathematical Physics from the University of Northern Colorado, and prior to that spent time at the University of Birmingham, UK, studying ripples in the fabric of space and time (i.e. gravitational waves).​


Chad Haney
, PhD, Research Associate Professor, Northwestern University

Exploring 3-D Medical Imaging Technology

Dr. Chad Haney is a biomedical engineer with over ten years of experience in multi-modality imaging research. He is a Research Associate Professor in the Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Biomedical Engineering, and Radiology. Although his primary area of research is oncology he has collaborated with a diverse group of researchers from evolutionary biologists to cardiovascular specialists.


Richard Kasemsarn,
Architect and Instructor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago and CTD

Architectural Design: How Structures Stand and Bridges Span

Richard Kasemsarn has been teaching at the Weekend Enrichment Programs and the Center for Talent Development since 2009. His courses take an interdisciplinary approach that demonstrates how science, engineering, and design can all be developed together. Kasemsarn studied architecture at the University of Michigan and continued his studies with an MA from Yale University. In addition to teaching classes at CTD, he also teaches at the School of the Art Institute while maintaining a practice in architecture.


Robert Lang
, Attorney and Teacher

Order in the Courtroom

Robert Lang grew up in the Chicago area and attended Deerfield High School. From Deerfield, Robert moved to Boston, where he graduated Summa Cum Laude from Brandeis University.  At Brandeis, Robert received High Honors for his Senior Thesis, “Transfer Taken Too Far.  The Juvenile Justice System and Its Adjudication of American Children Who Murder.”  Robert then graduated Cum Laude from Tulane Law School in New Orleans.  While in law school, Robert worked for the Cook County State’s Attorney, a large litigation firm in Atlanta, and the Environmental Law Clinic at Tulane.  Robert then moved back to Chicago, passed the Illinois Bar Exam and practiced immigration and family law before deciding to become a teacher.  Robert, who recently completed received his Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership, currently teaches Spanish at a middle school in a Chicago suburb.   Robert taught for CTD’s summer program for 7 years and was Dean of Students for the Apogee Program for 1 summer. 


Kori Milroy
, Instructor, Center for Talent Development

A Little Off the Spleen, Please! The History of Medicine from Barbers to Bots

Kori Milroy has been teaching high-achieving students for 13 years. She is a graduate of Loyola University Chicago and earned her MSEd at the Illinois Institute of Technology. She is a licensed teacher with endorsements in science and gifted education. She has previously taught the CTD courses Microscopic Biology, Debate the IssuesThe Science of Treasure Hunting, and The Daring and Design of Flight.

 

Kazi Sadman, PhD candidate in Materials Science & Engineering

Projectile Motion:It’s (Not) Rocket Science! II

Kazi Sadman received his B.S. in materials science from the University of Florida. He is currently a fourth year PhD candidate at Northwestern University, also in materials science. His research is focused on understanding the fundamental properties of charge containing large molecules, and relating molecular details to measurable material parameters. He hopes to continue research after graduate school in either academic or industrial settings. 


Alex Randhava
, Engineer and Educator

Ahead of the Curve: Using the Engineering Method to Define Problems in New Ways

Monsoon: Engineering for Flash Floods

Alex Randhava is a teacher at Chicago Friends School.  He has designed and taught the engineering enrichment courses for the Center for Talent Development, taught history at Francis W. Parker School in Chicago, and taught every course in the catalog in Evanston's public schools.  He has extensive experience working in the development of engineering startups.  He holds two U.S. patents, and has received grants to fund design-phase engineering work from the USDA and NASA.  In the spring he pursues his true passion of coaching little-league baseball.

 

Fees & Policies

Fees
$95 for one person
$125 for two people
$135 for three or more people
$50 for families with proven financial need (families eligible for or that receive free or reduced lunch qualify for a reduced $50 conference fee) 50% off registration for Northwestern employees with Wild Card

Policies
Full refund for cancellations before May 15. $50 refund May 15 – June 9. No refund after June 9.

Northwestern University is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for all events and programs. Accommodations such as Sign Language interpreters, accessible seating and presentation materials in alternate format are provided upon request. Please contact us at ctd-enrichment@northwestern.edu by June 20. Every reasonable effort will be made to implement accommodations in an effective and timely manner.

Copyright 2014 Northwestern University Center for Talent Development